• The Development, Recovery & Persistence of Childhood Stuttering: The MDP Theory

      Dr. Christine Weber writes, “Stuttering, or Childhood Onset Fluency Disorder (DSM-5), is a neurodevelopmental disorder that begins when neural networks supporting speech, language, and emotional functions are displaying rapid development. How does stuttering develop, and what factors influence the recovery or persistence of stuttering?  The Multifactorial Dynamic Pathways (MDP) theory of stuttering emphasizes the dynamic developmental context in which stuttering emerges and follows its progression throughout early childhood. It takes into account evidence from neural development to address how stuttering arises, including genetic/epigenetic factors, motor, language, and emotional features.  Evidence from our multi-factor experimental approach in young children who stutter supports our earlier assertion that while stuttering ultimately reflects differences in speech sensorimotor processes, its course over the life span is strongly influenced by language and emotional factors. Around the time of onset of stuttering, steep maturational changes in many neurobehavioral systems are ongoing, and critical interactions among these systems likely play a major role in determining persistence of or recovery from stuttering. From longitudinal evidence, we present findings that children who go on to persist in stuttering exhibit subtle maturational delays in speech-motor control and some aspects of language processing, and display more stuttering-like disfluencies (SLDs). In contrast, the preschool children who would eventually recover already showed signs of more stable speech motor control, greater maturity in some of their language processing systems, and less severe stuttering at that age. The MDP theory encourages experimental and clinical approaches that will help to determine the specific factors that contribute to each child’s pathway to the diagnosis of stuttering and those factors most likely to promote recovery. The implications of the MDP for early, comprehensive and tailored treatments for enhancing the pathways for recovery from stuttering will be discussed. This work is from the Purdue Stuttering Project which was supported by a grant from the NIH’s National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders, DC00559.”

      $10
       
    • Achieving Successful Behavior Change

      Dr. Carmen Lefevre's presentation from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

      Dr. Lefevre writes," Gaining a clear understanding of a behaviour as well as its drivers and barriers is pivotal for successfully changing it. In the context of dysfluency, there are likely many different factors that influence the target behaviour (e.g. ‘speaking fluently’) and that need to each be understood and considered in the context of all other factors. Behavioural science provides methods for understanding behaviours and their influences, and for developing interventions that are most likely to be effective in their contexts. This talk will outline evidence-based principles of behaviour change and introduce a systematic method for designing interventions to change behaviour. This involves defining a clear target behaviour, conducting a behavioural analysis to identify the facilitators and barriers of the target behaviour, and identifying the most suitable behaviour change techniques for the context. The talk will illustrate how these principles and methods can be applied to a behaviour like stuttering using examples from previous work."

      $10
       
    • Desensitization with Parents

      Elaine Kelman and Ali Berquez, both from the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children in London, present at the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

    • The Teenage Brain: Understanding Developmental Context

      Dr. Catherine Sebastian's presentation from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

      Dr. Sebastian writes, "Adolescence is a key developmental window characterised by profound changes in cognitive, social and emotion skills. While the majority of young people negotiate the pressures of adolescence well, this stage of life is nonetheless characterised by an increase in risky behaviours, as well as in psychopathology associated with emotional dysregulation such as depression, anxiety and antisocial behaviour. Recent evidence suggests that ongoing brain development during this time of life may contribute to the onset or escalation of these symptoms and behaviours. This talk will review evidence showing ongoing brain development during the second decade of life, and will discuss links between brain development and adolescent behaviour. In particular, I will focus on processes supporting the ability to control our behaviours and emotions, and to understand others’ perspectives. Understanding these developmental processes may be helpful for clinicians working with this population in the context of dysfluency."

      $10
       
    • Bilingualism and Stuttering: Typical versus Clinical Speech Disfluency

      Dr. Courtney Byrd's presentation from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

      Dr. Byrd writes," Speech disfluencies provide valuable insight into the linguistic and motoric effort required for spoken communication. Expressions such as “second language fluency” and “word fluency” tasks reflect this concept. The types and frequencies of speech disfluencies children produce can be an index of language ability. Breakdowns in speech fluency are more likely when children attempt to produce utterances at the leading edge of their emerging linguistic capacity. Additionally, bilingual children appear to experience elevated levels of disfluency as they navigate multiple language systems, with potentially unequal levels of proficiency. Interestingly, there appears to be a critical behavioral overlap between what is considered typical and what is considered to be atypical in the disfluent speech among typically-developing monolingual and bilingual speakers and those speakers of one or more languages who present with a fluency disorder. This documented overlap makes it critical to determine if there are distinctive, qualitative and/or quantitative disfluent speech behaviors that differentiate language-typical mono-/bilingual children from matched peers with stuttering. The present talk will review the behaviors unique to stuttering in speakers of one or more language and the behaviors that overlap across typically fluent mono-/bilingual speakers and mono/bilingual speakers who stutter. From a theoretical perspective, identification of overlapping and distinguishing behaviors could serve to demonstrate the relative contributions of linguistic proficiency, linguistic planning, and speech motor control to fluency breakdowns in differing populations. From a clinical perspective, identification of behaviors that differentiate the behaviors characteristic of typical disfluency and stuttering in monolingual and bilingual speakers will enhance differential diagnosis across these speakers of one or more languages."

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • The Role of Attention in Therapy for Stuttering

      Jane Harley's presentation from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

      Ms. Harley writes, "My interest in the process of attention in stuttering therapy stems initially from a background in CBT and the information-processing theory and models which underpin CBT. These theoretical models propose that biases in what individuals attend to contribute to the mechanisms involved in uncomfortable human emotions such as anxiety. Our understanding of the nature and influence of attentional biases involved in social anxiety, emotional regulation, resilience and stuttering, is developing.

      The use of CBT in stuttering therapy is now main-stream. More recently, '3rd generation' or mindfulness-based approaches have developed within CBT and been applied in stuttering therapy. These approaches are also concerned with how information is attended to, based on the potential value of observing internal and external information that arises from a perspective of curiosity and acceptance. Attention processes are implicitly if not explicitly involved in other psychological approaches used in therapy for stuttering, such as Solution Focused Brief Therapy. Attention processes also impact in various ways in traditional fluency therapy and are involved in all interpersonal dynamics within therapy.

      My intention in this presentation is to explore selected aspects of the role played by attention within stuttering therapy. I will draw from theory and research from the fields of information-processing, mindfulness-based approaches and emotion-regulation, as well as clinical and qualitative accounts of the experience of stuttering."

      $10
       
    • Neurological Insights into Disfluent Speech Production: Challenges and Changes

      Dr. Martin Sommer's presentation from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

      Dr. Sommer writes, "Fluent speech is a fundamental prerequisite for social interaction in humans and a challenging task for the brain. Not all children acquire fluent speech; therefore stuttering persists after puberty in about 1 percent of adults. In recent years a broad range of technical innovations has allowed new insights into kinematics, underlying brain structure, brain function and the neurophysiology of fluent and dysfluent speech.

      Studying speech production is being improved by real-time very fast structural MR imaging observing the kinematics of articulators while speaking. This gives a substantiated insight into dysfluent speech patterns and will allow answering the question whether fluent sounding speech units are typically articulated in adults who stutter.

      A better insight into brain structure has been made possible by magnetic resonance imaging of water diffusion in the brain. It has uncovered a reduced integrity of white matter tracts, mostly in left inferior frontal areas. This has opened a whole new perspective to view stuttering as a speech area disconnection syndrome, and has motivated pioneering work from the Michigan group on longitudinal brain imaging studies in children who stutter.

      With its excellence time resolution, electroencephalography gives insight into the interplay of brain areas during speech preparation and shows an imbalanced timing of the activity of left hemispheric speech motor areas. The electrophysiological technique of transcranial magnetic stimulation enables investigating speech preparation with a very high time resolution, in order to assess speech preparatory processes of motor areas representing articulatory muscles. This allowed discovering an imperfect speech preparation in adults who stutter as a pathophysiological basis of dysfluent speech. It will allow differentiating a lack of facilitation from an excessive inhibition.

      Furthermore, transcranial magnetic stimulation gives a window on the hemispheric distribution of speech and non-speech related activations of articulatory muscles and as well as of hand muscles.

      In addition to technical advances, rare clinical cases on cerebellar lesions that modulate speech fluency further substantiate the structural basis of fluent and dysfluent speech production.

      Finally, refined questionnaires allow assessing the so-called anticipation of speech dysfluencies, which is the premonitory awareness that something is about to go wrong with speech fluency. We have assessed this in detail by deriving a questionnaire from Tourette’s syndrome to assess reliability and linguistic specificity of this premonitory awareness of dysfluencies in adults who stutter.

      Hence, the results of the last 20 years of research improve our understanding of dysfunctional nodes in speech networks, thereby refining and detailing current models of speech production. Beyond that, they expand future possibilities to study speech network modulation by therapy or external stimulation."

      $10
       
    • Graduate Instructor Bundle #1 ($40)

      These five titles are included in this bundle for the price of four.

      1. Basic Clinical Skills
      2. Working with Preschoolers Who Stutter
      3. A Fresh Look at Stuttering
      4. Therapy in Action: The School-Age Child Who Stutters
      5. Sharpening Counseling Skills

      $40
       
    • Graduate Instructor Bundle #2 ($40)

      These five titles are included in this bundle for the price of four.

      1. Stuttering: A Clinical Review of the Evidence
      2. Changing Thoughts & Feelings About Communication
      3. Avoidance Reduction Therapy
      4. Implementing Cognitive Behavior Therapy with School-Age Children
      5. Using Williams’ Normal Talking Approach to Help Children Make Speech Change

      $40
       
    • 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference Package ($60)

      This package includes all seven presentations from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference for the price of six.

      Titles Included:
      1. The Development, Recovery & Persistence of Childhood Stuttering: The MDP Theory
      2. Achieving Successful Behavior Change
      3. Desensitization with Parents
      4. The Teenage Brain: Understanding Developmental Context
      5. Bilingualism & Stuttering: Typical vs. Clinical Speech Dysfluency
      6. The Role of Attention in Therapy for Stuttering
      7. Neurological Insights into Disfluent Speech Production: Challenges and Changes

      $60
       
    • Cluttering: Another Look (#9720)

      In recent years, many advances have been made in understanding the communication disorder, cluttering.

      Kathleen Scaler Scott, Ph.D., of Misericordia University helps to clarify prior myths and explain recent research findings about cluttering. She presents the current lowest common denominator definition of cluttering and demonstrates how to apply this definition to assessment, differential diagnosis, and treatment.

      For clinicians who have been confused about how to identify, assess and treat cluttering, this 76-minute video provides practical strategies for understanding and managing complex clients.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Understanding New Genetic Findings in Stuttering (#6160)

      In this 72-minute video, Dennis Drayna, Ph.D., of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, provides an update on recent research findings in the genetics of stuttering.

      This video describes the evidence for genetic factors in stuttering and the genes discovered to date. It discusses the function of these genes and what they tell us about the underlying causes of stuttering. It also discusses efforts to create an animal model for stuttering by putting human stuttering mutations into mice and analyzing their ultrasonic vocalizations.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Kids Who Stutter: Parents Speak (#0080)

      In this 16 minute video, parents of children who stutter join a group of speech-language experts to talk compassionately and directly about what has worked for them as they interact with their child.

      The video features some of the world's leading hands-on therapists working with children who stutter: Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of The Florida State University's School of Communication Science and Disorders; Ellen Kelly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; speech-language consultants Frances Cook, MBE, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons), Cert CT (Oxford), Willie Botterill, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CT and Elaine Kelman, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CBT from the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children in London.

      $10
       
    • Alan Rabinowitz's Keynote Address at The Stuttering Foundation's 2005 2-Day Conference

      This Keynote presentation by renowned conservationist Alan Rabinowitz was given at the 2005 Stuttering Foundation two day workshop for school-based speech-language pathologists.

      $10
       
    • Alan Rabinowitz: Stuttering and the Big Cats (#6600)

      In this powerful hour-long presentation to young people who stutter, Alan Rabinowitz discusses how struggling with stuttering shaped his life and his long-time relationship with the endangered species he works to save.

      This intimate look inside the life of one of the world's greatest conservationists is sure to inspire.

      "Catching jaguars and tigers, negotiating with presidents and dictators - that's the easy stuff! The challenge for me has been living with the boy who'd come home from school every day and yearn for the darkness and safety of his closet." - Alan Rabinowitz

      $5
       
    • Basic Clinical Skills (#9600)

      This 128-minute program demonstrates speech management strategies to help you work effectively with children and adults who stutter.

      Chapters include:
      - Exploring talking and stuttering
      - Identification
      - Explore stuttering
      - Explore change
      - Tools for change
      - Soft starts
      - Changing rate
      - Voluntary stuttering
      - Holding and tolerating the moment of stuttering
      - Pullouts
      - Cancellations
      - Making change durable
      - Transfer
      - Disclosure
      - Wrapping things up

      Dynamic demonstration of stuttering therapy techniques by experts from around the world:

      Ali Biggart, BA (Hons), MSc, Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London; Jane Fry, MSc (psych. Couns.), PGDip, CT (Oxford), Reg MRCSLT, Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London; Willie Botterill, MSc, MRCSLT, Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London; Frances Cook, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons), Cert CT (Oxford), Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London; Barry Guitar, Ph.D., University of Vermont; Alison Nicholas, MSc, MRCSLT, Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London;Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder; Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa. Additional footage provided by June Campbell, M.A., private practice.

      Produced by Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont, in collaboration with Jane Fraser, president of the Stuttering Foundation of America. Video production by Bob O'Brien, Video Design Productions, Inc., Lake Zurich, IL. English material captured by Luke Jeans.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Tools for Success: A Cognitive Behavior Therapy Taster (#9900)

      Highlights from a workshop featuring Frances Cook, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons)Cert. CT (Oxford), and Willie Botterill, MSc, (Psych. Couns.), MRCSLT, provide insights into working with the cognitive aspects of stuttering.

      This 3 hour 45 minute "taster" into cognitive behavior therapy explores the interaction of thoughts, feelings, physical reactions and behaviors from the perspectives of children, parents and therapists.

      Ways to use the cognitive model are discussed and demonstrated.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      Laying the Groundwork for Success
      (04:04-) a. Exercise 1 - Meet Your Partner
      (09:21-) b. Exercise 2 - Best Hopes
      (11:09-) c. Best Hopes Analysis
      (20:22-) d. Where Are Your Now?
      (21:02-) e. Exercise 3 - Skills & Resources
      (24:05-) f. Skills & Resources Analysis
      Cognitive Behavior Therapy
      (31:39-) a. Overview
      (33:44-) b. Exercise 4 - Cognitive Therapy Model
      (43:02-) c. Using the Cognitive Therapy Model
      (44:15-) d. Therapeutic Alliance
      (46:02-) e. Characteristics of Cognitive Therapy
      (49:07-) f. Information Processing
      (53:30-) g. Appraisal & Anxiety
      Key Components of Therapy
      (59:35-) a. Overview
      (1:01:33-) b. Negative Automatic Thoughts
      (1:05:16-) c. Safety Behaviors
      (1:07:32-) d. Examples of the Vicious Circle
      Group CBT Video with Children
      (1:09:44-) a. Video
      (1:25:15-) b. Evaluation & Questions
      Group CBT Video with Parents
      (1:32:01-) a. Video
      (1:49:13-) b. Evaluation & Questions
      (1:58:44-) Cognitive Cycle for Families
      Steps in Therapy
      (2:10:19-) a. Practical Steps in Therapy
      (2:21:09-) b. Eliciting NATs
      (2:22:53-) c. Turn Questions into Statements
      (2:23:59-) d. Downward Arrow Catastrophic Thinking
      (2:25:47-) e. Identify Hot Thoughts
      (2:25:57-) f. Questions Therapists Ask
      (2:29:42-) g. Thought Record
      (2:39:14-) h. How to Identify NATs
      (2:40:36-) i. Working with NATs (Cognitive Reframing)
      (2:41:45-) j. Possible Directions
      (2:44:35-) k. More Questions Therapists Ask
      (2:46:20-) l. Unhelpful Thinking Patterns
      (2:58:21-) m. Socratic Questioning
      (3:00:06-) n. Behavioral Work/Experiments
      (3:02:07-) o. Problem Solving
      (3:12:17-) p. Problem Solving Steps
      (3:13:52-) q. Action Plans: Preparing for the Future
      (3:14:54-) r. Personal Action Plan
      Therapeutic Alliance
      (3:17:14-) a. Therapeutic Alliance
      (3:17:52-) b. Exercise 5 - Parent’s Vicious Cycle
      (3:19:39-) c. Evaluation & Questions
      (3:31:12-) d. Exercise 6 - Therapist’s Negative Cycles
      (3:33:16-) e. Evaluation & Questions
      (3:45:23-) Close

      Additional Therapy Footage includes Ali Berquez, MSc, MRCSLT Dip. CT (Oxford), Jane Fry, MSc (Psych. Couns).,MRCSLT., Dip.CT (Oxford), and Willie Botterill MSc, (Psych. Couns.), MRCSLT of the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London, England, and Jane Fraser, President, Stuttering Foundation, Memphis, TN.

      Special thanks to Boston University and Diane Fillion Parris, M.S., CCC-SLP, Boston University and the 20 Stuttering Foundation Workshop Attendees.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Solution Focused Brief Therapy Taster (#9950)

      Highlights from a workshop providing insights into working with Solution-Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT) and stuttering.

      This "taster" introduces viewers to the principles and practice of SFBT, providing examples of children, parents, and teenagers describing their "best hopes" for the future, using scales to determine the skills and resources they already have to attain that future and identifying the small signs of change along the way.

      PART 1
      (00:00-) SFBT Introduction
      (04:23-) Best Hopes
      (26:39-) Exercise - Best Hopes

      PART 2
      (52:52-) Origins of SFBT
      (59:19-) The Essence of SFBT
      (1:12:20-) The Miracle Question
      (1:41:40-) Exercise - Miracle Question

      PART 3
      (1:53:06-) SFBT Recap
      (1:58:48-) Overview of Opening & Subsequent Sessions
      (2:04:35-) Challenges
      (2:06:48-) References
      (2:08:07-) Using Scales with Children
      (2:22:24-) Using Scales with Parents
      (2:35:37-) Exercise - Using Scales

      PART 4
      (2:48:56-) Closing the Session
      (2:56:14-) Follow-Up During Subsequent Sessions
      (3:04:26-) Using Scales in Follow-ups
      (3:21:40-) Close

      Produced by the Stuttering Foundation, the 3 hour 30 minute video features Willie Botterill, MSc, (Psych. Couns.), MRCSLT, and Frances Cook, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons)Cert. CT(Oxford). Additional Therapy Footage includes Willie Botterill MSc, (Psych. Couns.), MRCSLT of the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London, England. Special thanks to Boston University and Diane Fillion Parris, M.S., CCC-SLP, Boston University and the 20 Stuttering Foundation Workshop Attendees.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • For Kids, By Kids: All Grown Up (#6345)

      This 20-minute video, hosted by Kristin A. Chmela, M.A., provides insight into the lives of four young adults, who 11 years earlier, were highlighted in the Stuttering Foundation's best selling video, "For Kids By Kids."

      In this inspiring new video, three common threads emerge as we hear Naomi, Daniel, Umang, and Tommy share their stories about growing up with stuttering.

      "I have imagined my son in a box, not knowing how he was going to move forward because of his stuttering. Watching this DVD made me realize he is going to be OK." -- Parent of 16-year-old who stutters.

      $10
       
    • A Fresh Look at Stuttering (#4083)

      "Wanting to be someone else is a waste of the person you are." This quote, attributed to both Marilyn Monroe and Kurt Cobain, may not resonate for someone who has spent most of his or her life desperately trying to hide stuttering.

      Daily exhaustion from changing words, making excuses, timing interactions, and getting others to do the talking leads to much more than frustration. The life impact from stuttering can affect confidence, spontaneity, job performance, and social interactions. Yet, the wish to be "fluent" often outweighs the freedom to communicate and the desire to make human connection.

      This 23-minute video follows adults who stutter through their gradual, emotional transformation. They discover the paradox that by accepting and embracing their stuttering rather than hiding it they achieve more fluent communication. They share their personal insights, successes and failures, and the sources of the courage they mustered in order to face fear, step out of their comfort zone, and accept themselves as they are.

      A film for adults and teens!

      $10
       
    • Working with PreSchoolers Who Stutter (#0162)

      Improve your ability to successfully treat stuttering in preschoolers. This one hour and 45 minute video offers comprehensive and practical strategies for working with young children:

      - a multidimensional approach to the assessment and treatment of preschoolers
      - guidelines based on new research on when to provide treatment
      - practical strategies to use in therapy
      - a structured approach to involve parents in the process.

      Demonstrations help you see and successfully model easy relaxed speech. The video includes excerpts with parents sharing their personal stories about being involved in treatment.

      Featuring Kristin Chmela, M.A., speech-language pathologist and Board Recognized Specialist in Fluency Disorders. Produced by the Stuttering Foundation.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • David Seidler - We Have a Voice (#6650)

      Academy award-winning screenwriter of The King's Speech, David Seidler, inspires young people who stutter in this marvelous hour-long presentation.

      In an eloquent keynote address, followed by a question and answer session, Seidler discusses how his own struggle with stuttering led him to admire King George VI whose radio addresses moved him as a child and led to his desire to share the King's story.

      Viewers of all ages will enjoy learning more about the man who wrote the screenplay that captivated the stuttering community and the world.

      $10
       
    • Parent Counseling: Conversations with David Luterman - Parts 1 & 2 (#6400)

      In this insightful, two-part program, sit in the room with master clinician, David Luterman, as he counsels parents of children who stutter. Then, eavesdrop on his discussion of the session with practicing clinicians.

      Part 1 is Group Therapy with Parents (1 hour); and Part 2 is Therapists' Review of Parent Session (1 hour).

      Viewers will witness these interactions, seldom seen.

      Special thanks to David M. Luterman, D.Ed., Professor Emeritus, Emerson College, Boston, and Director, Thayer Lindsey Family-Centered Nursery for Hearing Impaired Children; Diane Fillion Parris, M.S., Boston University; and the parent and clinician group.

      $20
       
    • 7 Tips for Talking with the Child Who Stutters (#0075)

      In this 16 minute video, a group of speech-language experts talk compassionately and directly to adults about how to promote easier talking as they interact with their preschool-age children. The professionals offer simple, easy-to-do tips that parents can begin to use immediately.

      The video features some of the world's leading hands-on therapists working with preschool children who stutter.

      They include: Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of The Florida State University's School of Communication Science and Disorders; Ellen Kelly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; speech-language consultants Frances Cook, MBE, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons), Cert CT (Oxford), Willie Botterill, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CT and Elaine Kelman, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CBT from the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children in London.

      $10
       
    • 7 Consejos para Hablar con el Niño que Tartamudez (#0075)

      In this 16 minute video, a group of speech-language experts talk compassionately and directly to adults about how to promote easier talking as they interact with their preschool-age children. The professionals offer simple, easy-to-do tips that parents can begin to use immediately.

      The video features some of the world's leading hands-on therapists working with preschool children who stutter.

      They include: Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of The Florida State University's School of Communication Science and Disorders; Ellen Kelly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; speech-language consultants Frances Cook, MBE, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons), Cert CT (Oxford), Willie Botterill, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CT and Elaine Kelman, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CBT from the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children in London.

      $10
       
    • La Tartamudez y Su Niño (#0073)

      A esta video se le pueden dar muchos usos. Se puede utilizar con familias en que un niño tartamudea, con terapeutas del habla que van a tratar a niños de edad preescolar y en las escuelas, universidades, centros de tratamiento y hospitales.

      Producido por Barry Guitar, Ph.D., Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., de la Universidad de Vermont, en collaboracion con Jane Fraser, presidente de la Stuttering Foundation, Diane Hill, M.A., Northwestern Universidad, Peter Ramig, Ph.D., Universidad de Colorado, y Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., de la Universidad de Iowa.

      The Stuttering Foundation agradece a Miami Children's Hospital, May Productions, la terapeuta del habla Lisette M. Betancourt, M.A., Ava Osle de Radio Lollipop, Henry Postigo, Nora Barriere, y Isidoro Zarco, M.D., sus contribuciones de trabajo, que permitieron convertir este projecto en realidad.

      $10
       
    • Stuttering: Straight Talk for Teachers (#0126)

      In this powerful 18-minute video, students who stutter talk to teachers about their experiences and experts in the field of speech pathology answer questions about what works and what doesn't in the classroom.

      A perfect length for an after-school inservice or short enough for a teacher to watch alone. The video answers common questions:

      - how to respond to the child who stutters in the classroom
      - what happens in speech therapy
      - how to handle teasing
      - how to deal with oral presentations

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction & Facts about Stuttering
      (02:11-) Examples of Stuttering
      (02:47-) How Children Feel about Stuttering
      (03:55-) Academic and Social Impacts
      (05:36-) What to Do When a Student Stutters
      (06:22-) Speech Tools
      (07:52-) What to Do about a Difficult Speaking Day
      (09:34-) What to Do about Interrupting
      (09:59-) What to Do about Oral Presentations
      (11:16-) Talking to the Entire Class about Stuttering
      (12:21-) How to Handle Teasing
      (13:48-) How to Encourage a Child to Participate in Class
      (14:11-) Speech Therapy for Stuttering
      (16:29-) Close

      Produced by: Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., The Florida State University and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont; in collaboration with Kristin Chmela, M.A., Northwestern University; Jane Fraser, president, The Stuttering Foundation; and Bill Murphy, M.A., Purdue University.

      Additional footage provided by: Barry Guitar, Ph.D., University of Vermont; Diane Hill, M.A., Northwestern University; Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder; and Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa.

      $10
       
    • Stuttering: Advice From The Heart For the Parents of Children and Teens Who Stutter (#6550)

      Fluency specialist, Kristin Chmela, M.A., CCC-SLP, talks to parents of children and teenagers who stutter, drawing upon her own experiences not only as a person who stutters but also as a parent, therapist, and teacher.

      Chmela urges parents to see each child as a gift; she also asks parents to consider several important guidelines as they rear a child who stutters.

      This 45-minute presentation was filmed live at the annual convention of Friends; The Association of Young People Who Stutter.

      Special thanks to Friends and its director Lee Caggiano, M.A., CCC-SLP.

      "This is one of the most powerful closing speeches I have ever seen. I felt like I was part of the audience and highly recommend others getting this DVD if not for themselves then for group settings. I know I'll be using it!" Voon Keong Pang, Stuttering Treatment & Research Trust-New Zealand

      $10
       
    • The Genius of Dean Williams (#0425)

      Gene Williams, a renowned authority on stuttering, has a unique philosophy and approach to stuttering therapy. This video provides classic footage of Dean working with a child who stutters.

      Dean believed that stuttering behavior in school children and adults is the result of their trying not to stutter. They struggle and tense up to avoid repetitions, prolongations, and blocks. However, these behaviors are more under their control than they realize. Dean's approach was to help his clients discover that they could change their behavior and learn to speak more easily.

      This video of him helping a young boy speak more easily can teach you how you can use this approach with your own clients. Try it!

      $10
       
    • Counseling: Listening To and Talking With Parents of Children Who Stutter (#9122)

      Parents play a key role in the treatment of children who stutter. Helping them recognize and cope with their own feelings about their child's stuttering is critical to success in therapy.

      In this 50-minute video, noted clinicians demonstrate and discuss strategies for counseling parents in all stages of the treatment process as the parent-clinician relationship develops.

      In this video, you will see key techniques for handling these and other situations demonstrated in actual counseling sessions, followed by expert analysis and advice on tactics you can employ.

      Topics Include:
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (02:45-) The First Contact
      (04:37-) The Initial Interview
      (15:11-) Counseling Both Parents
      (22:07-) Dealing with Fear and Resistance
      (29:31-) Later in the Process
      (36:36-) Working with a Group
      (42:45-) Close

      Produced by Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa; Barry Guitar, Ph.D., University of Vermont; and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont; in collaboration with Diane Hill, M.A., Northwestern University; Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder; and Jane Fraser, President of The Stuttering Foundation.

      $10
       
    • Stuttering and Your Child: Help for Parents (#0073)

      This 30 minute video is for parents and families of young children who stutter. (Formerly entitled: Stuttering and the Preschool Child) The focus is to help families understand stuttering and make changes to promote more fluent speech.

      - for parents whose child is stuttering.
      - for speech-language pathologists working with young
      children.
      - and for school, clinic, university, and hospital settings.

      "...this is perhaps the best buy in the nation for information on children and stuttering." ASHA Journal book review

      Produced by Barry Guitar, Ph.D. and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S. of the University of Vermont; in collaboration with Jane Fraser, Stuttering Foundation; Diane Hill, M.A., Northwestern University; Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder; Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa. Additional footage from Kristin A. Chmela, M.A., Northwestern University.

      $10
       
    • Stuttering: Straight Talk for Teens (#1076)

      The teen years are full of challenges. For teens who stutter, it can also be a lonely time. They need to know that they are not alone - and that real help is available.

      In this 30-minute video, teens share their experiences of stuttering and talk about what works for them. Narrated by high school student David Wilkins, who stutters himself, Stuttering: Straight Talk for Teens provides forthright information and advice on managing stuttering in academic and social settings. Noted clinicians demonstrate helpful techniques and discuss:

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) What causes stuttering
      (03:28-) Is there something wrong with you?
      (07:22-) Feelings you may have
      (08:39-) It’s not unusual to feel different
      (10:16-) How stuttering affected David and Amanda
      (12:09-) Feeling different and rejected
      (13:16-) Sometimes people don’t understand
      (13:59-) Reactions to teasing
      (14:43-) The feeling of panic
      (15:53-) Take all the time you need
      (17:24-) Feelings of frustration
      (18:48-) There is help
      (23:35-) Pushing and tension of stuttering
      (25:58-) Don’t avoid embarrassment or fear
      (28:43-) Resist time pressure
      (30:20-) Stuttering Foundation Publications

      This video is an excellent resource for teens and adults, their families, teachers, physicians, and speech-language pathologists.

      Produced by Barry Guitar, Ph.D., and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont; Edward G. Conture, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University; Jane Fraser, Stuttering Foundation; Hugo H. Gregory, Ph.D., Northwestern University; and Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder.

      $10
       
    • If You Stutter: Advice for Adults (#1083)

      An over 50-minute video on stuttering for adults who stutter, their families, and the professionals who work with them. Those who stutter share their personal stories and insights into what has helped them.

      Speech-language pathologists answer questions about stuttering and demonstrate a variety of therapy techniques, including:

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) What causes stuttering
      (04:52-) More men stutter than women
      (06:21-) If stuttering runs in the family…
      (07:02-) Does intelligence play a role?
      (08:00-) Is stuttering a psychological problem?
      (08:56-) Good and bad days of stuttering
      (09:41-) “Just relax.”
      (10:28-) People don’t stutter while singing
      (11:34-) “I’ve had therapy before…”
      (12:30-) Therapy
      (14:30-) Using a videotape as a tool
      (15:27-) Study your overall speech
      (18:10-) Attitudes and emotions
      (25:37-) Modification
      (41:53-) Transfer
      (47:57-) Maintenance and follow up
      (52:31-) Credits

      The broad range of perspectives and depth of information in this video ensure that it will be a lasting source of inspiration to those who stutter.

      Produced by: Barry Guitar, Ph.D. and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont; in collaboration with Jane Fraser, president, Stuttering Foundation; Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado; Hugo H. Gregory, Ph.D., Northwestern University. Narrated by June Haerle Campbell, M.A., Northwestern University. Additional footage provided by Deborah Kully, M.S., ISTAR, and Catherine Montgomery, M.S., AIS.

      $10
       
    • Avoidance Reduction Therapy in a Group Setting (#6740)

      The roots of Avoidance Reduction Therapy for Stuttering are found in the pioneering work of the late Joseph Sheehan, a professor of psychology at UCLA, and his wife Vivian Sheehan, a Los Angeles-based speech pathologist. The Sheehans applied concepts from conflict theory and role theory to formulate an explanation for the behaviors and paradoxes we observe in those who stutter.

      They described stuttering as an "approach-avoidance conflict," whereby competing desires to both speak and hold back from speaking result in (1) maladaptive reactive behaviors that interfere with communication, and (2) "mental gymnastics" that limit participation in daily life.

      In this 2-hour video, Vivian Sisskin, M.S., CCC-SLP from the University of Maryland, walks clinicians through methods of group therapy while providing the nuts and bolts of Avoidance Reduction Therapy.

      Sisskin, mentored by the Sheehans early in her career, outlines the basic principles, goals of treatment, and therapeutic strategies of her treatment program for stuttering.

      This presentation serves as both a tutorial for speech-language pathologists and a self-help primer for those who stutter. Activities and video demonstrations provide ideas for activities and assignments that lead to spontaneous, forward-moving communication, free of control.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Neurophysiology of Stuttering -Oxford 2011 (#6710)

      Neurophysiology studies the function of the central and the peripheral nervous system through the recording of bioelectrical activity, whether it is spontaneous or stimulated.

      During this 50 minute presentation, Martin Sommer, M.D., gives an overview of essential neurophysiological findings that improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of stuttering.

      Recorded live at the 2011 Oxford Dysfluency Conference in England.

      $10
       
    • Implementing CBT with School-age Children (#6500)

      Cognitive-behavioral therapy is one approach for helping children change their thoughts and feelings about stuttering. These changes can lead to better therapy outcomes as children develop coping strategies, test their beliefs about listener reactions, and take risks like using speech tools in front of others.

      In this 1 hour, 40 minute video, clinicians learn why unhelpful thoughts and feelings can interfere with stuttering therapy and then how to help children begin to make changes.

      Extending the information presented in the Stuttering Foundation's program 9900, "A Cognitive Behavior Therapy Taster," Lisa Scott, Ph.D. of The Florida State University, presents concrete therapy activities for helping children learn to cope with difficult speaking situations, identify unhelpful thoughts, and strategies for trying out new thoughts and behaviors.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (05:51-) The Cognitive Model
      (06:55-) Why is it so hard to help children achieve speech change?
      (10:27-) Possible Painful Experiences for CWS
      (11:53-) Unhelpful Thinking Patterns
      (17:09-) The Problem of Avoidance
      (22:46-) Reducing Barriers to Changes
      (27:52-) Strategy: Connecting Thoughts & Feelings
      (56:57-) CSQ - Coping Strategies Questionnaire
      (1:04:22-) Strategy: Behavioral Experiments
      (1:13:07-) Strategy: Identifying Supports
      (1:17:17-) Strategy: Increasing Coping Skills
      (1:25:33-) Strategy: Behavioral Activation
      (1:38:04-) Credits

      Special thanks to the University of Iowa, The Florida State University, Stuttering Foundation workshop participants, and Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • The School-age Child Who Stutters (#1079)

      This 38-minute video is an excellent resource and teaching tool for speech-language pathologists as well as teachers, parents, and physicians.

      Certain to further the understanding of stuttering and what can be done to help the school-age child, this DVD provides information about:

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (01:39-) Monosyllabic whole-word repetitions
      (02:31-) Repetition of sounds and syllables
      (03:12-) Examples of sound prolongations
      (03:58-) Blocks
      (05:21-) Understanding a child’s feelings and beliefs
      (12:07-) Treatment
      (19:33)- Modification
      (30:03-) Transfer
      (35:32-) Closing

      ASHA Journal review says, "Speech-language pathologists, teachers, parents, and physicians will find this video helpful. It will be useful as in-service presentations as well as a take home tape for parents. In many cases, it will also be helpful for the child to view the tape. This is the kind of video that you will want to keep several copies of on hand so you won't have to loan or give away your last copy."

      Produced by: Edward G. Conture, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, Barry Guitar, Ph.D., University of Vermont, Jane Fraser, Stuttering Foundation, June H. Campbell,M.A., Northwestern University, Hugo H. Gregory,Ph.D., Northwestern University, Peter Ramig, Ph.D. University of Colorado-Boulder, and Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa.

      $10
       
    • Sharpening Counseling Skills (#9800)

      This exciting 3 hour program features renowned audiologist and expert counselor, David M. Luterman, D.Ed.

      Luterman's philosophy of counseling centers around deep listening and silent witnessing of our clients' stories and concerns as we refrain from providing immediate advice, information, or solutions.

      We believe that this film is an important tool for all those in the helping professions.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • ADHD and Children Who Stutter (#6700)

      Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopment disorder characterized by reduced attention, increased impulsivity and increased hyperactivity. Speech-language pathologists must consider the impact that ADHD traits can have on an individual's ability to efficiently and fluently communicate.

      In this 54-minute film, Joseph Donaher, Ph.D., CCC-SLP of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, introduces the clinical characteristics of ADHD, the literature on stuttering and ADHD, and clinical management accommodations that may improve therapeutic outcomes for children who stutter who present with coexisting attention and focusing concerns.

      Filmed at the 9th Oxford Dysfluency Conference, St. Catherine's College, Oxford, UK, September 2011.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Therapy in Action - Dr. Charles Van Riper (#1080)

      One of the all time greats in action!

      This classic series of nine films together in one video shows Dr. Charles Van Riper of Western Michigan University working with an adult who stutters. Therapy was done in seven sessions - one week apart - a total of seven hours of therapy. The eighth video covers a follow-up session one year later. The ninth video is a 20-year follow up and discussion of the long-term effectiveness of this therapy with Barry Guitar, Ph.D.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Diagnostic Interview
      (27:23-) Identification
      (1:12:59-) Desensitization
      (2:00:23-) Variations
      (2:42:22-) Modification/Cancellation
      (3:22:20-) Modification and Monitoring
      (4:12:30-) Stabilization
      (4:57:52-) One Year Follow-Up
      (5:26:11-) Twenty Year Follow-Up with Jeff and Dr. Barry Guitar

      $25
       
    • Decoding IDEA Eligibility (#6100)

      Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of The Florida State University, discusses concrete strategies for establishing eligibility for school-age children who stutter according to IDEA guidelines.

      Specific methods are described for documenting developmental, academic, and functional information for children who stutter. Then, applying evaluation data to determine adverse educational impact and the educational relevance of the child's stuttering problem is highlighted.

      Examples from various state standards are provided as well as a case study profiling a specific case. (1 hour 50 minutes)

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (01:21-) Case Study
      (11:30-) IDEA Overview
      (17:24-) Eligibility
      (23:23-) Strategies for Evaluating
      (24:25-) Developmental Information
      (27:02-) Tools for Gathering Developmental Information
      (28:41-) Academic Information (part 1)
      (33:46-) DIBELS
      (37:01-) Academic Information (Part 2)
      (40:21-) Iowa Core Curriculum Standards
      (42:14-) Virginia’s Standards of Learning
      (43:16-) Tools for Gathering Academic Information
      (45:16-) Functional Information
      (48:52-) Tools for Gathering Functional Information
      (51:11-) Functional Limitations Tables
      (1:03:30-) Documenting Confidence
      (1:16:35-) Other Assessment Tools
      (1:20:14-) Functional Limitation Table of Assertiveness
      (1:22:13-) Documenting Educational Relevance
      (1:26:36-) Determining Adverse Educational Impact
      (1:30:40-) Overall Functional Level for Fluency
      (1:33:02-) Case Study Profile
      (1:48:20-) Credits

      $10
       
    • EBP and PBE: Closing the Gap (#6720)

      Discussions about evidence-based practice often culminate in claims that there is one best approach to treatment of a particular type of client, or that we lack appropriate evidence or that clinicians lack access to what evidence we have.

      In this presentation, in an effort to frame these claims more positively, Dr. Nan Bernstein Ratner, Ed.D., argues that there is both research and common-sense evidence that these claims are wrong. She also suggests that in the debate about best practices in fluency treatment, there is indeed a need to search out and integrate many sources of evidence that either support our approach to a case or suggest a need for reconsideration, adjustment or change.

      Many options exist to find and use this evidence, and many more await implementation either in the clinic or in our research undertakings.

      This 55 minute talk provides a range of options for both clinical researchers and practicing clinicians who want to find, use and integrate evidence of treatment effectiveness.

      Dr. Ratner suggests some fruitful ways to frame further discussions on the topics of evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence to answer commonly posed questions about the effectiveness of what clinicians do.

      Filmed at the 9th Oxford Dysfluency Conference, St. Catherine's College, Oxford, UK, September 2011.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Tartamudez Para Niños, Por Niños - SPANISH (#9172)

      Conoce a Swish y sus amigos jovenes! Ellos hablan como lidiar con la burla y como ensenar a otros sobre la tartamudez. La animacion de cartones y ninos verdaderos que vienen a unirse ayudar a otros ninos que tartamudean unidos en este entretenido video de 12 minutos.

      Stuttering Foundation agradece a May International Productions y la terapeuta del habla Lisette Betancourt, M.A., CCC-SLP y Miami Children's Hospital sus contribuciones de trabajo que permetieron convertir este projecto en realidad.

      $10
       
    • Assessment and Treatment of Childhood Stuttering (#6200)

      Edward G. Conture, Ph.D., of Vanderbilt University, discusses current data-based approaches to the assessment and treatment of preschool children who stutter.

      Conture discusses current theoretical and clinical approaches to this population with supporting data that is based on more than 30 years of clinical and research experience.

      Specific attention is paid to emotional and speech-language contributions to early stuttering, means for considering emotional and speech-language behaviors during assessment and ways to apply this information to treatment.

      Several case studies are presented and discussed by the presenter and audience to arrive at an informed approach to the assessment and treatment of the young child who stutters and his/her family. (3 hours 36 minutes)

      (start time) TOPIC
      I. Overview: Assessment, Treatment and Theoretical Models of Developmental Stuttering
      a. (00:00-) Introduction
      b. (05:32-) Theoretical Models
      c. (27:11-) Case Study #1
      d. (32:30-) Notions & Urban Legends
      e. (37:15-) Possible trajectories of Developmental Stuttering
      f. (44:56-) Four Models: Theory, Assessment & Treatment
      g. (52:49-) Case Study #2
      II. Dual Diathesis Model
      a. (1:03:43-) Three Problems for All Models of Stuttering
      b. (1:05:52-) Possible Solution
      c. (1:23:01-) Secondary Behaviors
      e. (1:29:24-) Case Study #3
      f. (1:36:17-) The DD-S Model Briefly Deconstructed
      g. (1:36:31-) Speech-Language Diathesis
      h. (1:40:17-) Emotional Diathesis
      i. (1:47:45-) Stressors: Our Environment
      j. (1:58:11-) Case Study #4
      III. Some Evidence for the DD-S Model
      a. (2:06:23-) Some Evidence
      b. (2:11:24-) Deficiency Perspective
      c. (2:17:29-) Picture Naming Priming Experiments
      d. (2:23:38-) Three Clinical Cases
      e. (2:25:38-) Lexical/Semantic Priming
      f. (2:27:26-) Syntactic Prime Conditions
      g. (2:29:55-) Disassociations
      h. (2:35:32-) Sufficiency Perspective
      i. (2:35:55-) Clinical Example of Preschool CWS
      j. (2:36:53-) Emotional Processes
      k. (2:43:58-) Tests of Emotional Reactivity and Regulation
      l. (2:49:32-) Relation of E. Reactivity to E. Regulation
      m.(2:56:37-) Case Study #5
      IV. Speech-Language Interacts with Emotions
      a. (3:06:00-) Some Treatment Outcome Evidence
      b. (3:13:10-) Case Study #6
      V. Basic Assumptions Regarding Assessment of Childhood Stuttering
      a. (3:25:50-) Four Models: Theory, Assessment & Treatment
      b. (3:29:58-) Types of Speech Disfluency
      c. (3:31:04-) Disfluency Count Sheet
      d. (3:33:23-) Exacerbation
      e. (3:35:13-) Close

      $20
       
    • Moving from Assessment to Intervention Planning (#6300)

      This video provides viewers with a framework for developing interventions for preschool children who stutter and for their families.

      Using the 'Demands and Capacities' model to guide treatment planning, Sheryl Gottwald, Ph.D., CCC-SLP of the University of New Hampshire, identifies environmental variables to consider when constructing goals for the family.

      Likewise, Dr. Gottwald reviews the skill areas that contribute to fluency and highlights those areas that may benefit from child-directed early intervention sessions. The research presented in this 54-minute video supports these recommendations.

      Special thanks to Boston University and the Stuttering Foundation workshop attendees.

      $10
       
    • Basic Principles of Stuttering Therapy (#9080)

      Clinicians are still receiving training in the treatment of stuttering by the expert speech language pathologist, Hugo Gregory, Ph.D., through footage shot at Texas Christian University in 1998.

      This DVD is made possible through the tireless efforts of Carolyn Gregory, June Campbell, Diane Hill, Jennifer Watson, and Kristin Chmela. (52-minutes)

      $10
       
    • Using Williams' Normal Talking Approach (#6325)

      "Using Williams' Normal Talking Approach to Help Children Make Speech Change" will increase your confidence and flexibility in teaching students to modify their speech behavior!

      In this 153-minute video, filmed at the Stuttering Foundation's 2014 two-day conference on working with the school-aged child, Dr. Patricia Zebrowski describes how to teach children to make speech change using Dean Williams' Normal Talking Approach as a foundation. Then, Dr. Zebrowski reviews the various speech modification strategies clinicians can use with children who stutter, including what each technique is designed to change within the speech system and how to use apply the technique in therapy.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Stuttering: For Kids, By Kids - ENGLISH (#9182)

      Meet Swish and his young friends! They talk about stuttering, dealing with teasing, what helps, and how to teach others about stuttering.

      Cartoon animation and real children come together to help other kids who stutter in this lively and engaging 12-minute film.

      Produced by Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., The Florida State University and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont; with footage provided by Bill Murphy, M.A., Purdue University and Kristin Chmela, M.A., Northwestern University, in collaboration with Lee Caggiano, M.A., private practice, Joe Donaher, Ph.D., Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and Jane Fraser, Stuttering Foundation of America.

      Animation by the Computer Graphics Technology Department of Purdue University, with special thanks to Dr. Mark Bannatyne, Michelle Jackson, Helen Kang, Ali Modara, and Rich Sun.

      $10
       
    • Autism Spectrum Disorder and Stuttering (#6730)

      There has been increased interest in understanding the variety of speech disfluency patterns among those with autism spectrum disorders.

      Case studies that describe types of disfluencies have added to our knowledge base. While both stuttering and 'atypical' disfluencies (final part-word repetition) have been documented, many questions remain unanswered. What treatment methods are effective? What are the priorities for improved communication? What should we expect for positive functional outcomes?

      In this 2 hour presentation, Vivian Sisskin, M.S., CCC-SLP from the University of Maryland, summarizes the literature pertaining to disfluency in autism, and provides basic principles to aid in differential diagnosis and treatment planning.

      A case study, demonstrating effective treatment for final part-word repetitions, highlights a problem-solving approach to clinical management, using both learning style in autism and strategies from traditional fluency therapies.

      Filmed at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia during the Stuttering Foundation Mid-Atlantic Workshop, Philadelphia, PA, July 2012. Filmed and edited by Bob O'Brien, Video Design Productions, Inc., Lake Zurich, IL.

      Special thanks to Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D. and Joseph Donaher, Ph.D., and the 15 Stuttering Foundation Mid-Atlantic Workshop Attendees.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Stuttering: A Clinical Review of the Evidence (#6330)

      In this engaging 77-minute lecture, Dr. Joe Donaher of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, provides a framework for clinicians to view childhood stuttering from an evidence-based perspective. He presents the latest research in stuttering onset and development, genetics, neurophysiology, and speech motor control.

      He then helps clinicians understand how to apply this information to the children on their caseloads through the use of several case examples, emphasizing the importance of viewing each child as an individual and creating a strong therapeutic alliance.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Helping Children Change Thoughts & Feelings (#6335)

      For many children who stutter, successfully managing communication involves more than just changing speech. During this 2 hour 55 minute video, renowned clinician Vivian Sisskin, presents a multidimensional approach as a foundation to help children address the thoughts and feelings that sometimes co-exist with stuttering.

      She offers concrete strategies to help children become more mindful about their communication, to answer others' questions about what stuttering is and why they talk the way they do, and to recognize how their feelings influence their behavior.

      Additionally, she presents therapy ideas that will assist children in learning to stand up for themselves, to make active choices about speaking situations, plan actions they will take, and take risks.

      Recommendations for documentation and measurement are also provided.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Clinical Management of Chronic Stuttering (#9331)

      This 58-minute video features Eugene B. Cooper, Ph.D. and Hugo H. Gregory, Ph.D. in live footage from a 1984 conference, "Clinical Management of Chronic Stuttering."

      From the archives of the Stuttering Foundation, and despite some granular video quality, these two presentations are sure to enlighten a new generation of therapists.

      $10
       
    • Scoring Disfluencies (#6350)

      Many methods have been developed to count speech disfluencies, and in this 1-hour video, clinicians are trained to differentiate between various types of disfluencies, how to code them, and analyze the data accordingly.

      While this is just one aspect of a comprehensive fluency assessment, it is important to obtain reliable frequency measures for assessment purposes as well as to determine treatment effectiveness.

      After being trained in several methods, including Northwestern University's "Systematic Disfluency Analysis" (Campbell and Hill, 1987) and Vanderbilt University's disfluency counting method (Conture, 2001), Diane Parris, M.S., CCC-SLP, BRS-FD of Boston University demonstrates a pragmatic approach to scoring disfluencies using two case examples for practice.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (05:29-) How to Analyze a Speech Sample
      (07:11-) Scoring Disfluencies
      (14:19-) Case Study #1
      (21:39-) Scoring Transcript from Case Study
      (51:08-) Fluency Analysis
      (52:13-) Case Study #2
      (57:35-) Close

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Stuttering Modification Techniques (#9221)

      This single program combines five classic videotapes from the 1970's presenting clinician Dr. Harold Starbuck using his stuttering modification therapy techniques with a group of teens and young adults.

      Despite the scratchy audio track and grainy visual quality of the tapes, you will learn a great deal from Dr. Starbuck's lucid teaching style.

      "His demonstrations of each step of therapy using several individuals who stutter will make it possible for you to develop your own version of stuttering modification therapy from start to finish." - Barry Guitar, Ph.D.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Program 1: Identification and Analysis
      (41:05-) Program 2: The Process of Post-Block Correction
      (1:23:41-) Program 3: The Process of In-Block and Pre-Block Correction
      (2:07:57-) Program 4: Predetermined Speech, Dismissal and Transfer
      (2:47:24-) Program 5: Motivation

      $20
       
    • Counseling the Parents of Children Who Stutter (#9090)

      This 60-minute DVD featuring speech-language pathologist Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa, includes:

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Purpose of Presentation
      (01:33-) Recognizing & Understanding Emotions
      (11:46-) Parent Emotions
      (21:19-) Counseling Issues
      (35:29-) Confusion & Inadequacy
      (43:21-) Confusion & Anger

      It is an ideal tool for clinicians who work with the school-age child who stutters. The information and practical ideas encompassed in this film ensure that it will be a lasting source of help to school clinicians, parents, teachers and health care professionals.

      $10
       
    • Stuttering 101 (#9501)

      This 71-minute video, featuring speech-language pathologist Barry Guitar, Ph.D., is an ideal tool for clinicians who work with the school-age child who stutters.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (03:38-) What is Stuttering Modification?
      (06:37-) What is Fluency Shaping?
      Elements of Stuttering Modification
      (09:30-) A. Key Concepts
      B. Steps in Therapy
      (17:00-) 1. Exploring Stuttering
      (23:47-) 2. Modifying Stuttering in the Therapy Room
      (40:48-) 3. Transferring
      (44:56-) 4. Maintaining
      Elements of Fluency Shaping
      (46:55-) A. Key Concepts
      B. Steps in Therapy
      (50:58-) 1. Establish Fluency
      (52:05-) 2. Teaching Fluency Skills
      (1:06:26-) 3. Transferring Fluency
      (1:08:40-) 4. Maintaining Fluency
      (1:09:01-) Wrap-Up

      This video is part of a series of programs from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician."

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • The School Clinician: Ways to be More Effective (#9502)

      This 84-minute video features speech-language pathologist Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder and includes:

      - Teaching children to identify moments of stuttering
      - Sequencing therapy in a meaningful way
      - Developing transfer/maintenance skill

      It is an ideal tool for clinicians who work with the school-age child who stutters. Part of a series of tapes from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician."

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (08:04-) General Stuttering Info
      (14:17-) Intervention with Children Who Stutter
      (14:53-) a. Sample 1: Chloe
      (19:46-) b. Sample 2: Nikky
      (29:23-) c. Sample 3: Thomas
      (31:52-) Basic Principles Underlying Intervention with CWS
      (48:24-) Sample 4a: Christopher (9 years old)
      (54:58-) Samples 4b: Christopher (2 years later)
      (1:08:50-) Determining Whether Treatment is Recommended for Young Children
      (1:13:41-) Fiberoptic Laryngoscopy
      (1:24:17-) Close

      $10
       
    • Multidimensional Approach to Assessment & Treatment (#9503)

      This 73-minute video features speech-language pathologist E. Charles Healey, Ph.D., University of Nebraska.

      His presentation includes:
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (02:50-) Assumptions & Perspectives
      (04:25-) Some Recent Multidimensional Models of Stuttering
      (07:49-) Conceptual Framework for Our Model
      (08:26-) Our Multidimensional Model
      (09:37-) The CALMS Model of Stuttering
      (11:28-) The CALMS Rating Scale
      (30:30-) Case Study - Kyle
      (36:51-) Bridging the Gap Between Assessment & Treatment
      (38:41-) a. Cognitive Component Activities
      (50:53-) b. Affective Component Activities
      (53:42-) c. Linguistic Component Activities
      (59:59-) d. Motor Component Activities
      (1:06:03-) e. Social Component Activities
      (1:09:25-) Final Thoughts

      It is an ideal tool for clinicians who work with the school-age child who stutters. Part of a series of videos from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician." The information and practical ideas encompassed in this film ensure that it will be a lasting source of help to school clinicians, parents, teachers, and health care professionals.

      $10
       
    • Dealing Effectively with Attitudes and Emotions (#9504)

      This 79-minute video, featuring experienced speech-language pathologist Kristin Chmela, M.A., is an ideal tool for clinicians who work with the school-age child who stutters.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (12:34-) Attitudes & Emotions
      (18:43-) Dealing Effectively with Attitudes & Emotions
      (19:32-) Three Types of Counseling
      (21:35-) Listening & Valuing
      (25:15-) Who am I as a Clinician?
      (26:25-) What is My View of Stuttering?
      (27:25-) Ways to be More Effective
      (27:40-) a. Programs vs. Programs
      (29:18-) b. Create a Communicative Space
      (35:04-) c. Brush Up on Normal Development
      (46:48-) d. Study Your Skills
      (56:18-) e. Take Timed Risks
      (1:06:33-) f. Conceptualize Cognitive-Affective Topics
      (1:16:12-) g. Document Your Goals
      (1:16:39-) Wrap-Up

      Part of a series of videos from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician."

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Dealing with Guilt and Shame (#9505)

      This exciting video features Bill Murphy, M.A., Purdue University on how to cope with shame and guilt.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (07:20-) Why Worry About the Thoughts & Emotions of School-Age Children Who Stutter?
      (11:57-) The Goal
      (12:57-) The Stuttering Triangle
      (14:00-) Assessment Tools
      (22:35-) Paper & Pencil Tasks
      (25:12-) Portfolio Assessment
      (29:55-) Child Observation
      (30:54-) Therapy for Preventing/Reducing Negative Thoughts
      (31:37-) Shame vs. Guilt
      (45:00-) The Conspiracy of Easy Fluency
      (46:53-) Goals
      (49:18-) Islands of Competency
      (50:47-) Keys to Progress
      (51:40-) Two Approaches to Healthy Thoughts & Feelings
      (53:01-) Desensitization: Externalizing Stuttering (Level 1)
      (55:30-) Activities to Desensitize/Externalize
      (1:06:34-) Desensitization: Level 2
      (1:09:07-) More Desensitization Level 1 Examples
      (1:14:00-) Dealing with Bullying
      (1:23:47-) Let’s Talk to Your Class
      (1:27:35-) Closing Remarks

      Part of a series of programs from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician."

      $10
       
    • Stuttering Intervention for Teenagers (#9506)

      This 90-minute video, featuring speech-language pathologist Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., is an ideal tool for clinicians working with adolescents who stutter.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Stuttering Intervention for Teenagers
      (10:41-) Understanding Adolescence
      (18:37-) Getting to Know the Adolescent
      (33:02-) UI Program for Teens Who Stutter
      (35:38-) A. Motor Training & Mental Training
      B. Motor Training
      (37:15-) 1. Education
      (44:26-) 2. Behavioral Awareness
      (50:20-) 3. Problem Solving
      (59:40-) a. Fluency Skills
      (1:01:51-) b. Stuttering Modification
      (1:08:07-) 4. Relaxation
      C. Mental Training
      (1:10:04-) 1. Cognitive Restructuring
      (1:10:52-) 2. Automatic Thoughts
      (1:14:14-) 3. Identifying Automatic Thoughts
      (1:18:34-) 4. Tips from Athletes
      (1:25:24-) 5. Guided Imagery
      (1:28:00-) 6. Emotions Related to Stuttering

      Part of a series of programs from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician."

      $10
       
    • Cluttering (#9700)

      This 42-minute video demonstrates cluttering, and should help you work more effectively with children and adults who clutter.

      Chapters include:
      - Most common symptoms of cluttering
      - Coexisting problems with cluttering
      - Evaluation of cluttering
      - Treatment of cluttering

      Dynamic demonstration of cluttering therapy techniques by experts.

      Written and narrated by Florence L. Myers, Ph.D., Adelphi University; Kenneth O. St. Louis, Ph.D., West Virginia University.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

     
     
    • The Development, Recovery & Persistence of Childhood Stuttering: The MDP Theory

      Dr. Christine Weber writes, “Stuttering, or Childhood Onset Fluency Disorder (DSM-5), is a neurodevelopmental disorder that begins when neural networks supporting speech, language, and emotional functions are displaying rapid development. How does stuttering develop, and what factors influence the recovery or persistence of stuttering?  The Multifactorial Dynamic Pathways (MDP) theory of stuttering emphasizes the dynamic developmental context in which stuttering emerges and follows its progression throughout early childhood. It takes into account evidence from neural development to address how stuttering arises, including genetic/epigenetic factors, motor, language, and emotional features.  Evidence from our multi-factor experimental approach in young children who stutter supports our earlier assertion that while stuttering ultimately reflects differences in speech sensorimotor processes, its course over the life span is strongly influenced by language and emotional factors. Around the time of onset of stuttering, steep maturational changes in many neurobehavioral systems are ongoing, and critical interactions among these systems likely play a major role in determining persistence of or recovery from stuttering. From longitudinal evidence, we present findings that children who go on to persist in stuttering exhibit subtle maturational delays in speech-motor control and some aspects of language processing, and display more stuttering-like disfluencies (SLDs). In contrast, the preschool children who would eventually recover already showed signs of more stable speech motor control, greater maturity in some of their language processing systems, and less severe stuttering at that age. The MDP theory encourages experimental and clinical approaches that will help to determine the specific factors that contribute to each child’s pathway to the diagnosis of stuttering and those factors most likely to promote recovery. The implications of the MDP for early, comprehensive and tailored treatments for enhancing the pathways for recovery from stuttering will be discussed. This work is from the Purdue Stuttering Project which was supported by a grant from the NIH’s National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders, DC00559.”

    • Achieving Successful Behavior Change

      Dr. Carmen Lefevre's presentation from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

      Dr. Lefevre writes," Gaining a clear understanding of a behaviour as well as its drivers and barriers is pivotal for successfully changing it. In the context of dysfluency, there are likely many different factors that influence the target behaviour (e.g. ‘speaking fluently’) and that need to each be understood and considered in the context of all other factors. Behavioural science provides methods for understanding behaviours and their influences, and for developing interventions that are most likely to be effective in their contexts. This talk will outline evidence-based principles of behaviour change and introduce a systematic method for designing interventions to change behaviour. This involves defining a clear target behaviour, conducting a behavioural analysis to identify the facilitators and barriers of the target behaviour, and identifying the most suitable behaviour change techniques for the context. The talk will illustrate how these principles and methods can be applied to a behaviour like stuttering using examples from previous work."

    • Desensitization with Parents

      Elaine Kelman and Ali Berquez, both from the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children in London, present at the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

    • The Teenage Brain: Understanding Developmental Context

      Dr. Catherine Sebastian's presentation from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

      Dr. Sebastian writes, "Adolescence is a key developmental window characterised by profound changes in cognitive, social and emotion skills. While the majority of young people negotiate the pressures of adolescence well, this stage of life is nonetheless characterised by an increase in risky behaviours, as well as in psychopathology associated with emotional dysregulation such as depression, anxiety and antisocial behaviour. Recent evidence suggests that ongoing brain development during this time of life may contribute to the onset or escalation of these symptoms and behaviours. This talk will review evidence showing ongoing brain development during the second decade of life, and will discuss links between brain development and adolescent behaviour. In particular, I will focus on processes supporting the ability to control our behaviours and emotions, and to understand others’ perspectives. Understanding these developmental processes may be helpful for clinicians working with this population in the context of dysfluency."

    • Bilingualism and Stuttering: Typical versus Clinical Speech Disfluency

      Dr. Courtney Byrd's presentation from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

      Dr. Byrd writes," Speech disfluencies provide valuable insight into the linguistic and motoric effort required for spoken communication. Expressions such as “second language fluency” and “word fluency” tasks reflect this concept. The types and frequencies of speech disfluencies children produce can be an index of language ability. Breakdowns in speech fluency are more likely when children attempt to produce utterances at the leading edge of their emerging linguistic capacity. Additionally, bilingual children appear to experience elevated levels of disfluency as they navigate multiple language systems, with potentially unequal levels of proficiency. Interestingly, there appears to be a critical behavioral overlap between what is considered typical and what is considered to be atypical in the disfluent speech among typically-developing monolingual and bilingual speakers and those speakers of one or more languages who present with a fluency disorder. This documented overlap makes it critical to determine if there are distinctive, qualitative and/or quantitative disfluent speech behaviors that differentiate language-typical mono-/bilingual children from matched peers with stuttering. The present talk will review the behaviors unique to stuttering in speakers of one or more language and the behaviors that overlap across typically fluent mono-/bilingual speakers and mono/bilingual speakers who stutter. From a theoretical perspective, identification of overlapping and distinguishing behaviors could serve to demonstrate the relative contributions of linguistic proficiency, linguistic planning, and speech motor control to fluency breakdowns in differing populations. From a clinical perspective, identification of behaviors that differentiate the behaviors characteristic of typical disfluency and stuttering in monolingual and bilingual speakers will enhance differential diagnosis across these speakers of one or more languages."

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • The Role of Attention in Therapy for Stuttering

      Jane Harley's presentation from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

      Ms. Harley writes, "My interest in the process of attention in stuttering therapy stems initially from a background in CBT and the information-processing theory and models which underpin CBT. These theoretical models propose that biases in what individuals attend to contribute to the mechanisms involved in uncomfortable human emotions such as anxiety. Our understanding of the nature and influence of attentional biases involved in social anxiety, emotional regulation, resilience and stuttering, is developing.

      The use of CBT in stuttering therapy is now main-stream. More recently, '3rd generation' or mindfulness-based approaches have developed within CBT and been applied in stuttering therapy. These approaches are also concerned with how information is attended to, based on the potential value of observing internal and external information that arises from a perspective of curiosity and acceptance. Attention processes are implicitly if not explicitly involved in other psychological approaches used in therapy for stuttering, such as Solution Focused Brief Therapy. Attention processes also impact in various ways in traditional fluency therapy and are involved in all interpersonal dynamics within therapy.

      My intention in this presentation is to explore selected aspects of the role played by attention within stuttering therapy. I will draw from theory and research from the fields of information-processing, mindfulness-based approaches and emotion-regulation, as well as clinical and qualitative accounts of the experience of stuttering."

    • Neurological Insights into Disfluent Speech Production: Challenges and Changes

      Dr. Martin Sommer's presentation from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

      Dr. Sommer writes, "Fluent speech is a fundamental prerequisite for social interaction in humans and a challenging task for the brain. Not all children acquire fluent speech; therefore stuttering persists after puberty in about 1 percent of adults. In recent years a broad range of technical innovations has allowed new insights into kinematics, underlying brain structure, brain function and the neurophysiology of fluent and dysfluent speech.

      Studying speech production is being improved by real-time very fast structural MR imaging observing the kinematics of articulators while speaking. This gives a substantiated insight into dysfluent speech patterns and will allow answering the question whether fluent sounding speech units are typically articulated in adults who stutter.

      A better insight into brain structure has been made possible by magnetic resonance imaging of water diffusion in the brain. It has uncovered a reduced integrity of white matter tracts, mostly in left inferior frontal areas. This has opened a whole new perspective to view stuttering as a speech area disconnection syndrome, and has motivated pioneering work from the Michigan group on longitudinal brain imaging studies in children who stutter.

      With its excellence time resolution, electroencephalography gives insight into the interplay of brain areas during speech preparation and shows an imbalanced timing of the activity of left hemispheric speech motor areas. The electrophysiological technique of transcranial magnetic stimulation enables investigating speech preparation with a very high time resolution, in order to assess speech preparatory processes of motor areas representing articulatory muscles. This allowed discovering an imperfect speech preparation in adults who stutter as a pathophysiological basis of dysfluent speech. It will allow differentiating a lack of facilitation from an excessive inhibition.

      Furthermore, transcranial magnetic stimulation gives a window on the hemispheric distribution of speech and non-speech related activations of articulatory muscles and as well as of hand muscles.

      In addition to technical advances, rare clinical cases on cerebellar lesions that modulate speech fluency further substantiate the structural basis of fluent and dysfluent speech production.

      Finally, refined questionnaires allow assessing the so-called anticipation of speech dysfluencies, which is the premonitory awareness that something is about to go wrong with speech fluency. We have assessed this in detail by deriving a questionnaire from Tourette’s syndrome to assess reliability and linguistic specificity of this premonitory awareness of dysfluencies in adults who stutter.

      Hence, the results of the last 20 years of research improve our understanding of dysfunctional nodes in speech networks, thereby refining and detailing current models of speech production. Beyond that, they expand future possibilities to study speech network modulation by therapy or external stimulation."

    • Graduate Instructor Bundle #1 ($40)

      These five titles are included in this bundle for the price of four.

      1. Basic Clinical Skills
      2. Working with Preschoolers Who Stutter
      3. A Fresh Look at Stuttering
      4. Therapy in Action: The School-Age Child Who Stutters
      5. Sharpening Counseling Skills

    • Graduate Instructor Bundle #2 ($40)

      These five titles are included in this bundle for the price of four.

      1. Stuttering: A Clinical Review of the Evidence
      2. Changing Thoughts & Feelings About Communication
      3. Avoidance Reduction Therapy
      4. Implementing Cognitive Behavior Therapy with School-Age Children
      5. Using Williams’ Normal Talking Approach to Help Children Make Speech Change

    • 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference Package ($60)

      This package includes all seven presentations from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference for the price of six.

      Titles Included:
      1. The Development, Recovery & Persistence of Childhood Stuttering: The MDP Theory
      2. Achieving Successful Behavior Change
      3. Desensitization with Parents
      4. The Teenage Brain: Understanding Developmental Context
      5. Bilingualism & Stuttering: Typical vs. Clinical Speech Dysfluency
      6. The Role of Attention in Therapy for Stuttering
      7. Neurological Insights into Disfluent Speech Production: Challenges and Changes

    • Cluttering: Another Look (#9720)

      In recent years, many advances have been made in understanding the communication disorder, cluttering.

      Kathleen Scaler Scott, Ph.D., of Misericordia University helps to clarify prior myths and explain recent research findings about cluttering. She presents the current lowest common denominator definition of cluttering and demonstrates how to apply this definition to assessment, differential diagnosis, and treatment.

      For clinicians who have been confused about how to identify, assess and treat cluttering, this 76-minute video provides practical strategies for understanding and managing complex clients.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Understanding New Genetic Findings in Stuttering (#6160)

      In this 72-minute video, Dennis Drayna, Ph.D., of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, provides an update on recent research findings in the genetics of stuttering.

      This video describes the evidence for genetic factors in stuttering and the genes discovered to date. It discusses the function of these genes and what they tell us about the underlying causes of stuttering. It also discusses efforts to create an animal model for stuttering by putting human stuttering mutations into mice and analyzing their ultrasonic vocalizations.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Kids Who Stutter: Parents Speak (#0080)

      In this 16 minute video, parents of children who stutter join a group of speech-language experts to talk compassionately and directly about what has worked for them as they interact with their child.

      The video features some of the world's leading hands-on therapists working with children who stutter: Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of The Florida State University's School of Communication Science and Disorders; Ellen Kelly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; speech-language consultants Frances Cook, MBE, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons), Cert CT (Oxford), Willie Botterill, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CT and Elaine Kelman, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CBT from the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children in London.

    • Alan Rabinowitz's Keynote Address at The Stuttering Foundation's 2005 2-Day Conference

      This Keynote presentation by renowned conservationist Alan Rabinowitz was given at the 2005 Stuttering Foundation two day workshop for school-based speech-language pathologists.

    • Alan Rabinowitz: Stuttering and the Big Cats (#6600)

      In this powerful hour-long presentation to young people who stutter, Alan Rabinowitz discusses how struggling with stuttering shaped his life and his long-time relationship with the endangered species he works to save.

      This intimate look inside the life of one of the world's greatest conservationists is sure to inspire.

      "Catching jaguars and tigers, negotiating with presidents and dictators - that's the easy stuff! The challenge for me has been living with the boy who'd come home from school every day and yearn for the darkness and safety of his closet." - Alan Rabinowitz

    • Basic Clinical Skills (#9600)

      This 128-minute program demonstrates speech management strategies to help you work effectively with children and adults who stutter.

      Chapters include:
      - Exploring talking and stuttering
      - Identification
      - Explore stuttering
      - Explore change
      - Tools for change
      - Soft starts
      - Changing rate
      - Voluntary stuttering
      - Holding and tolerating the moment of stuttering
      - Pullouts
      - Cancellations
      - Making change durable
      - Transfer
      - Disclosure
      - Wrapping things up

      Dynamic demonstration of stuttering therapy techniques by experts from around the world:

      Ali Biggart, BA (Hons), MSc, Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London; Jane Fry, MSc (psych. Couns.), PGDip, CT (Oxford), Reg MRCSLT, Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London; Willie Botterill, MSc, MRCSLT, Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London; Frances Cook, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons), Cert CT (Oxford), Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London; Barry Guitar, Ph.D., University of Vermont; Alison Nicholas, MSc, MRCSLT, Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London;Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder; Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa. Additional footage provided by June Campbell, M.A., private practice.

      Produced by Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont, in collaboration with Jane Fraser, president of the Stuttering Foundation of America. Video production by Bob O'Brien, Video Design Productions, Inc., Lake Zurich, IL. English material captured by Luke Jeans.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Tools for Success: A Cognitive Behavior Therapy Taster (#9900)

      Highlights from a workshop featuring Frances Cook, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons)Cert. CT (Oxford), and Willie Botterill, MSc, (Psych. Couns.), MRCSLT, provide insights into working with the cognitive aspects of stuttering.

      This 3 hour 45 minute "taster" into cognitive behavior therapy explores the interaction of thoughts, feelings, physical reactions and behaviors from the perspectives of children, parents and therapists.

      Ways to use the cognitive model are discussed and demonstrated.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      Laying the Groundwork for Success
      (04:04-) a. Exercise 1 - Meet Your Partner
      (09:21-) b. Exercise 2 - Best Hopes
      (11:09-) c. Best Hopes Analysis
      (20:22-) d. Where Are Your Now?
      (21:02-) e. Exercise 3 - Skills & Resources
      (24:05-) f. Skills & Resources Analysis
      Cognitive Behavior Therapy
      (31:39-) a. Overview
      (33:44-) b. Exercise 4 - Cognitive Therapy Model
      (43:02-) c. Using the Cognitive Therapy Model
      (44:15-) d. Therapeutic Alliance
      (46:02-) e. Characteristics of Cognitive Therapy
      (49:07-) f. Information Processing
      (53:30-) g. Appraisal & Anxiety
      Key Components of Therapy
      (59:35-) a. Overview
      (1:01:33-) b. Negative Automatic Thoughts
      (1:05:16-) c. Safety Behaviors
      (1:07:32-) d. Examples of the Vicious Circle
      Group CBT Video with Children
      (1:09:44-) a. Video
      (1:25:15-) b. Evaluation & Questions
      Group CBT Video with Parents
      (1:32:01-) a. Video
      (1:49:13-) b. Evaluation & Questions
      (1:58:44-) Cognitive Cycle for Families
      Steps in Therapy
      (2:10:19-) a. Practical Steps in Therapy
      (2:21:09-) b. Eliciting NATs
      (2:22:53-) c. Turn Questions into Statements
      (2:23:59-) d. Downward Arrow Catastrophic Thinking
      (2:25:47-) e. Identify Hot Thoughts
      (2:25:57-) f. Questions Therapists Ask
      (2:29:42-) g. Thought Record
      (2:39:14-) h. How to Identify NATs
      (2:40:36-) i. Working with NATs (Cognitive Reframing)
      (2:41:45-) j. Possible Directions
      (2:44:35-) k. More Questions Therapists Ask
      (2:46:20-) l. Unhelpful Thinking Patterns
      (2:58:21-) m. Socratic Questioning
      (3:00:06-) n. Behavioral Work/Experiments
      (3:02:07-) o. Problem Solving
      (3:12:17-) p. Problem Solving Steps
      (3:13:52-) q. Action Plans: Preparing for the Future
      (3:14:54-) r. Personal Action Plan
      Therapeutic Alliance
      (3:17:14-) a. Therapeutic Alliance
      (3:17:52-) b. Exercise 5 - Parent’s Vicious Cycle
      (3:19:39-) c. Evaluation & Questions
      (3:31:12-) d. Exercise 6 - Therapist’s Negative Cycles
      (3:33:16-) e. Evaluation & Questions
      (3:45:23-) Close

      Additional Therapy Footage includes Ali Berquez, MSc, MRCSLT Dip. CT (Oxford), Jane Fry, MSc (Psych. Couns).,MRCSLT., Dip.CT (Oxford), and Willie Botterill MSc, (Psych. Couns.), MRCSLT of the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London, England, and Jane Fraser, President, Stuttering Foundation, Memphis, TN.

      Special thanks to Boston University and Diane Fillion Parris, M.S., CCC-SLP, Boston University and the 20 Stuttering Foundation Workshop Attendees.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Solution Focused Brief Therapy Taster (#9950)

      Highlights from a workshop providing insights into working with Solution-Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT) and stuttering.

      This "taster" introduces viewers to the principles and practice of SFBT, providing examples of children, parents, and teenagers describing their "best hopes" for the future, using scales to determine the skills and resources they already have to attain that future and identifying the small signs of change along the way.

      PART 1
      (00:00-) SFBT Introduction
      (04:23-) Best Hopes
      (26:39-) Exercise - Best Hopes

      PART 2
      (52:52-) Origins of SFBT
      (59:19-) The Essence of SFBT
      (1:12:20-) The Miracle Question
      (1:41:40-) Exercise - Miracle Question

      PART 3
      (1:53:06-) SFBT Recap
      (1:58:48-) Overview of Opening & Subsequent Sessions
      (2:04:35-) Challenges
      (2:06:48-) References
      (2:08:07-) Using Scales with Children
      (2:22:24-) Using Scales with Parents
      (2:35:37-) Exercise - Using Scales

      PART 4
      (2:48:56-) Closing the Session
      (2:56:14-) Follow-Up During Subsequent Sessions
      (3:04:26-) Using Scales in Follow-ups
      (3:21:40-) Close

      Produced by the Stuttering Foundation, the 3 hour 30 minute video features Willie Botterill, MSc, (Psych. Couns.), MRCSLT, and Frances Cook, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons)Cert. CT(Oxford). Additional Therapy Footage includes Willie Botterill MSc, (Psych. Couns.), MRCSLT of the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London, England. Special thanks to Boston University and Diane Fillion Parris, M.S., CCC-SLP, Boston University and the 20 Stuttering Foundation Workshop Attendees.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • For Kids, By Kids: All Grown Up (#6345)

      This 20-minute video, hosted by Kristin A. Chmela, M.A., provides insight into the lives of four young adults, who 11 years earlier, were highlighted in the Stuttering Foundation's best selling video, "For Kids By Kids."

      In this inspiring new video, three common threads emerge as we hear Naomi, Daniel, Umang, and Tommy share their stories about growing up with stuttering.

      "I have imagined my son in a box, not knowing how he was going to move forward because of his stuttering. Watching this DVD made me realize he is going to be OK." -- Parent of 16-year-old who stutters.

    • A Fresh Look at Stuttering (#4083)

      "Wanting to be someone else is a waste of the person you are." This quote, attributed to both Marilyn Monroe and Kurt Cobain, may not resonate for someone who has spent most of his or her life desperately trying to hide stuttering.

      Daily exhaustion from changing words, making excuses, timing interactions, and getting others to do the talking leads to much more than frustration. The life impact from stuttering can affect confidence, spontaneity, job performance, and social interactions. Yet, the wish to be "fluent" often outweighs the freedom to communicate and the desire to make human connection.

      This 23-minute video follows adults who stutter through their gradual, emotional transformation. They discover the paradox that by accepting and embracing their stuttering rather than hiding it they achieve more fluent communication. They share their personal insights, successes and failures, and the sources of the courage they mustered in order to face fear, step out of their comfort zone, and accept themselves as they are.

      A film for adults and teens!

    • Working with PreSchoolers Who Stutter (#0162)

      Improve your ability to successfully treat stuttering in preschoolers. This one hour and 45 minute video offers comprehensive and practical strategies for working with young children:

      - a multidimensional approach to the assessment and treatment of preschoolers
      - guidelines based on new research on when to provide treatment
      - practical strategies to use in therapy
      - a structured approach to involve parents in the process.

      Demonstrations help you see and successfully model easy relaxed speech. The video includes excerpts with parents sharing their personal stories about being involved in treatment.

      Featuring Kristin Chmela, M.A., speech-language pathologist and Board Recognized Specialist in Fluency Disorders. Produced by the Stuttering Foundation.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • David Seidler - We Have a Voice (#6650)

      Academy award-winning screenwriter of The King's Speech, David Seidler, inspires young people who stutter in this marvelous hour-long presentation.

      In an eloquent keynote address, followed by a question and answer session, Seidler discusses how his own struggle with stuttering led him to admire King George VI whose radio addresses moved him as a child and led to his desire to share the King's story.

      Viewers of all ages will enjoy learning more about the man who wrote the screenplay that captivated the stuttering community and the world.

    • Parent Counseling: Conversations with David Luterman - Parts 1 & 2 (#6400)

      In this insightful, two-part program, sit in the room with master clinician, David Luterman, as he counsels parents of children who stutter. Then, eavesdrop on his discussion of the session with practicing clinicians.

      Part 1 is Group Therapy with Parents (1 hour); and Part 2 is Therapists' Review of Parent Session (1 hour).

      Viewers will witness these interactions, seldom seen.

      Special thanks to David M. Luterman, D.Ed., Professor Emeritus, Emerson College, Boston, and Director, Thayer Lindsey Family-Centered Nursery for Hearing Impaired Children; Diane Fillion Parris, M.S., Boston University; and the parent and clinician group.

    • 7 Tips for Talking with the Child Who Stutters (#0075)

      In this 16 minute video, a group of speech-language experts talk compassionately and directly to adults about how to promote easier talking as they interact with their preschool-age children. The professionals offer simple, easy-to-do tips that parents can begin to use immediately.

      The video features some of the world's leading hands-on therapists working with preschool children who stutter.

      They include: Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of The Florida State University's School of Communication Science and Disorders; Ellen Kelly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; speech-language consultants Frances Cook, MBE, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons), Cert CT (Oxford), Willie Botterill, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CT and Elaine Kelman, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CBT from the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children in London.

    • 7 Consejos para Hablar con el Niño que Tartamudez (#0075)

      In this 16 minute video, a group of speech-language experts talk compassionately and directly to adults about how to promote easier talking as they interact with their preschool-age children. The professionals offer simple, easy-to-do tips that parents can begin to use immediately.

      The video features some of the world's leading hands-on therapists working with preschool children who stutter.

      They include: Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of The Florida State University's School of Communication Science and Disorders; Ellen Kelly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; speech-language consultants Frances Cook, MBE, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons), Cert CT (Oxford), Willie Botterill, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CT and Elaine Kelman, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CBT from the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children in London.

    • La Tartamudez y Su Niño (#0073)

      A esta video se le pueden dar muchos usos. Se puede utilizar con familias en que un niño tartamudea, con terapeutas del habla que van a tratar a niños de edad preescolar y en las escuelas, universidades, centros de tratamiento y hospitales.

      Producido por Barry Guitar, Ph.D., Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., de la Universidad de Vermont, en collaboracion con Jane Fraser, presidente de la Stuttering Foundation, Diane Hill, M.A., Northwestern Universidad, Peter Ramig, Ph.D., Universidad de Colorado, y Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., de la Universidad de Iowa.

      The Stuttering Foundation agradece a Miami Children's Hospital, May Productions, la terapeuta del habla Lisette M. Betancourt, M.A., Ava Osle de Radio Lollipop, Henry Postigo, Nora Barriere, y Isidoro Zarco, M.D., sus contribuciones de trabajo, que permitieron convertir este projecto en realidad.

    • Stuttering: Straight Talk for Teachers (#0126)

      In this powerful 18-minute video, students who stutter talk to teachers about their experiences and experts in the field of speech pathology answer questions about what works and what doesn't in the classroom.

      A perfect length for an after-school inservice or short enough for a teacher to watch alone. The video answers common questions:

      - how to respond to the child who stutters in the classroom
      - what happens in speech therapy
      - how to handle teasing
      - how to deal with oral presentations

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction & Facts about Stuttering
      (02:11-) Examples of Stuttering
      (02:47-) How Children Feel about Stuttering
      (03:55-) Academic and Social Impacts
      (05:36-) What to Do When a Student Stutters
      (06:22-) Speech Tools
      (07:52-) What to Do about a Difficult Speaking Day
      (09:34-) What to Do about Interrupting
      (09:59-) What to Do about Oral Presentations
      (11:16-) Talking to the Entire Class about Stuttering
      (12:21-) How to Handle Teasing
      (13:48-) How to Encourage a Child to Participate in Class
      (14:11-) Speech Therapy for Stuttering
      (16:29-) Close

      Produced by: Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., The Florida State University and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont; in collaboration with Kristin Chmela, M.A., Northwestern University; Jane Fraser, president, The Stuttering Foundation; and Bill Murphy, M.A., Purdue University.

      Additional footage provided by: Barry Guitar, Ph.D., University of Vermont; Diane Hill, M.A., Northwestern University; Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder; and Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa.

    • Stuttering: Advice From The Heart For the Parents of Children and Teens Who Stutter (#6550)

      Fluency specialist, Kristin Chmela, M.A., CCC-SLP, talks to parents of children and teenagers who stutter, drawing upon her own experiences not only as a person who stutters but also as a parent, therapist, and teacher.

      Chmela urges parents to see each child as a gift; she also asks parents to consider several important guidelines as they rear a child who stutters.

      This 45-minute presentation was filmed live at the annual convention of Friends; The Association of Young People Who Stutter.

      Special thanks to Friends and its director Lee Caggiano, M.A., CCC-SLP.

      "This is one of the most powerful closing speeches I have ever seen. I felt like I was part of the audience and highly recommend others getting this DVD if not for themselves then for group settings. I know I'll be using it!" Voon Keong Pang, Stuttering Treatment & Research Trust-New Zealand

    • The Genius of Dean Williams (#0425)

      Gene Williams, a renowned authority on stuttering, has a unique philosophy and approach to stuttering therapy. This video provides classic footage of Dean working with a child who stutters.

      Dean believed that stuttering behavior in school children and adults is the result of their trying not to stutter. They struggle and tense up to avoid repetitions, prolongations, and blocks. However, these behaviors are more under their control than they realize. Dean's approach was to help his clients discover that they could change their behavior and learn to speak more easily.

      This video of him helping a young boy speak more easily can teach you how you can use this approach with your own clients. Try it!

    • Counseling: Listening To and Talking With Parents of Children Who Stutter (#9122)

      Parents play a key role in the treatment of children who stutter. Helping them recognize and cope with their own feelings about their child's stuttering is critical to success in therapy.

      In this 50-minute video, noted clinicians demonstrate and discuss strategies for counseling parents in all stages of the treatment process as the parent-clinician relationship develops.

      In this video, you will see key techniques for handling these and other situations demonstrated in actual counseling sessions, followed by expert analysis and advice on tactics you can employ.

      Topics Include:
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (02:45-) The First Contact
      (04:37-) The Initial Interview
      (15:11-) Counseling Both Parents
      (22:07-) Dealing with Fear and Resistance
      (29:31-) Later in the Process
      (36:36-) Working with a Group
      (42:45-) Close

      Produced by Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa; Barry Guitar, Ph.D., University of Vermont; and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont; in collaboration with Diane Hill, M.A., Northwestern University; Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder; and Jane Fraser, President of The Stuttering Foundation.

    • Stuttering and Your Child: Help for Parents (#0073)

      This 30 minute video is for parents and families of young children who stutter. (Formerly entitled: Stuttering and the Preschool Child) The focus is to help families understand stuttering and make changes to promote more fluent speech.

      - for parents whose child is stuttering.
      - for speech-language pathologists working with young
      children.
      - and for school, clinic, university, and hospital settings.

      "...this is perhaps the best buy in the nation for information on children and stuttering." ASHA Journal book review

      Produced by Barry Guitar, Ph.D. and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S. of the University of Vermont; in collaboration with Jane Fraser, Stuttering Foundation; Diane Hill, M.A., Northwestern University; Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder; Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa. Additional footage from Kristin A. Chmela, M.A., Northwestern University.

    • Stuttering: Straight Talk for Teens (#1076)

      The teen years are full of challenges. For teens who stutter, it can also be a lonely time. They need to know that they are not alone - and that real help is available.

      In this 30-minute video, teens share their experiences of stuttering and talk about what works for them. Narrated by high school student David Wilkins, who stutters himself, Stuttering: Straight Talk for Teens provides forthright information and advice on managing stuttering in academic and social settings. Noted clinicians demonstrate helpful techniques and discuss:

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) What causes stuttering
      (03:28-) Is there something wrong with you?
      (07:22-) Feelings you may have
      (08:39-) It’s not unusual to feel different
      (10:16-) How stuttering affected David and Amanda
      (12:09-) Feeling different and rejected
      (13:16-) Sometimes people don’t understand
      (13:59-) Reactions to teasing
      (14:43-) The feeling of panic
      (15:53-) Take all the time you need
      (17:24-) Feelings of frustration
      (18:48-) There is help
      (23:35-) Pushing and tension of stuttering
      (25:58-) Don’t avoid embarrassment or fear
      (28:43-) Resist time pressure
      (30:20-) Stuttering Foundation Publications

      This video is an excellent resource for teens and adults, their families, teachers, physicians, and speech-language pathologists.

      Produced by Barry Guitar, Ph.D., and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont; Edward G. Conture, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University; Jane Fraser, Stuttering Foundation; Hugo H. Gregory, Ph.D., Northwestern University; and Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder.

    • If You Stutter: Advice for Adults (#1083)

      An over 50-minute video on stuttering for adults who stutter, their families, and the professionals who work with them. Those who stutter share their personal stories and insights into what has helped them.

      Speech-language pathologists answer questions about stuttering and demonstrate a variety of therapy techniques, including:

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) What causes stuttering
      (04:52-) More men stutter than women
      (06:21-) If stuttering runs in the family…
      (07:02-) Does intelligence play a role?
      (08:00-) Is stuttering a psychological problem?
      (08:56-) Good and bad days of stuttering
      (09:41-) “Just relax.”
      (10:28-) People don’t stutter while singing
      (11:34-) “I’ve had therapy before…”
      (12:30-) Therapy
      (14:30-) Using a videotape as a tool
      (15:27-) Study your overall speech
      (18:10-) Attitudes and emotions
      (25:37-) Modification
      (41:53-) Transfer
      (47:57-) Maintenance and follow up
      (52:31-) Credits

      The broad range of perspectives and depth of information in this video ensure that it will be a lasting source of inspiration to those who stutter.

      Produced by: Barry Guitar, Ph.D. and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont; in collaboration with Jane Fraser, president, Stuttering Foundation; Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado; Hugo H. Gregory, Ph.D., Northwestern University. Narrated by June Haerle Campbell, M.A., Northwestern University. Additional footage provided by Deborah Kully, M.S., ISTAR, and Catherine Montgomery, M.S., AIS.

    • Avoidance Reduction Therapy in a Group Setting (#6740)

      The roots of Avoidance Reduction Therapy for Stuttering are found in the pioneering work of the late Joseph Sheehan, a professor of psychology at UCLA, and his wife Vivian Sheehan, a Los Angeles-based speech pathologist. The Sheehans applied concepts from conflict theory and role theory to formulate an explanation for the behaviors and paradoxes we observe in those who stutter.

      They described stuttering as an "approach-avoidance conflict," whereby competing desires to both speak and hold back from speaking result in (1) maladaptive reactive behaviors that interfere with communication, and (2) "mental gymnastics" that limit participation in daily life.

      In this 2-hour video, Vivian Sisskin, M.S., CCC-SLP from the University of Maryland, walks clinicians through methods of group therapy while providing the nuts and bolts of Avoidance Reduction Therapy.

      Sisskin, mentored by the Sheehans early in her career, outlines the basic principles, goals of treatment, and therapeutic strategies of her treatment program for stuttering.

      This presentation serves as both a tutorial for speech-language pathologists and a self-help primer for those who stutter. Activities and video demonstrations provide ideas for activities and assignments that lead to spontaneous, forward-moving communication, free of control.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Neurophysiology of Stuttering -Oxford 2011 (#6710)

      Neurophysiology studies the function of the central and the peripheral nervous system through the recording of bioelectrical activity, whether it is spontaneous or stimulated.

      During this 50 minute presentation, Martin Sommer, M.D., gives an overview of essential neurophysiological findings that improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of stuttering.

      Recorded live at the 2011 Oxford Dysfluency Conference in England.

    • Implementing CBT with School-age Children (#6500)

      Cognitive-behavioral therapy is one approach for helping children change their thoughts and feelings about stuttering. These changes can lead to better therapy outcomes as children develop coping strategies, test their beliefs about listener reactions, and take risks like using speech tools in front of others.

      In this 1 hour, 40 minute video, clinicians learn why unhelpful thoughts and feelings can interfere with stuttering therapy and then how to help children begin to make changes.

      Extending the information presented in the Stuttering Foundation's program 9900, "A Cognitive Behavior Therapy Taster," Lisa Scott, Ph.D. of The Florida State University, presents concrete therapy activities for helping children learn to cope with difficult speaking situations, identify unhelpful thoughts, and strategies for trying out new thoughts and behaviors.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (05:51-) The Cognitive Model
      (06:55-) Why is it so hard to help children achieve speech change?
      (10:27-) Possible Painful Experiences for CWS
      (11:53-) Unhelpful Thinking Patterns
      (17:09-) The Problem of Avoidance
      (22:46-) Reducing Barriers to Changes
      (27:52-) Strategy: Connecting Thoughts & Feelings
      (56:57-) CSQ - Coping Strategies Questionnaire
      (1:04:22-) Strategy: Behavioral Experiments
      (1:13:07-) Strategy: Identifying Supports
      (1:17:17-) Strategy: Increasing Coping Skills
      (1:25:33-) Strategy: Behavioral Activation
      (1:38:04-) Credits

      Special thanks to the University of Iowa, The Florida State University, Stuttering Foundation workshop participants, and Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • The School-age Child Who Stutters (#1079)

      This 38-minute video is an excellent resource and teaching tool for speech-language pathologists as well as teachers, parents, and physicians.

      Certain to further the understanding of stuttering and what can be done to help the school-age child, this DVD provides information about:

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (01:39-) Monosyllabic whole-word repetitions
      (02:31-) Repetition of sounds and syllables
      (03:12-) Examples of sound prolongations
      (03:58-) Blocks
      (05:21-) Understanding a child’s feelings and beliefs
      (12:07-) Treatment
      (19:33)- Modification
      (30:03-) Transfer
      (35:32-) Closing

      ASHA Journal review says, "Speech-language pathologists, teachers, parents, and physicians will find this video helpful. It will be useful as in-service presentations as well as a take home tape for parents. In many cases, it will also be helpful for the child to view the tape. This is the kind of video that you will want to keep several copies of on hand so you won't have to loan or give away your last copy."

      Produced by: Edward G. Conture, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, Barry Guitar, Ph.D., University of Vermont, Jane Fraser, Stuttering Foundation, June H. Campbell,M.A., Northwestern University, Hugo H. Gregory,Ph.D., Northwestern University, Peter Ramig, Ph.D. University of Colorado-Boulder, and Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa.

    • Sharpening Counseling Skills (#9800)

      This exciting 3 hour program features renowned audiologist and expert counselor, David M. Luterman, D.Ed.

      Luterman's philosophy of counseling centers around deep listening and silent witnessing of our clients' stories and concerns as we refrain from providing immediate advice, information, or solutions.

      We believe that this film is an important tool for all those in the helping professions.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • ADHD and Children Who Stutter (#6700)

      Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopment disorder characterized by reduced attention, increased impulsivity and increased hyperactivity. Speech-language pathologists must consider the impact that ADHD traits can have on an individual's ability to efficiently and fluently communicate.

      In this 54-minute film, Joseph Donaher, Ph.D., CCC-SLP of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, introduces the clinical characteristics of ADHD, the literature on stuttering and ADHD, and clinical management accommodations that may improve therapeutic outcomes for children who stutter who present with coexisting attention and focusing concerns.

      Filmed at the 9th Oxford Dysfluency Conference, St. Catherine's College, Oxford, UK, September 2011.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Therapy in Action - Dr. Charles Van Riper (#1080)

      One of the all time greats in action!

      This classic series of nine films together in one video shows Dr. Charles Van Riper of Western Michigan University working with an adult who stutters. Therapy was done in seven sessions - one week apart - a total of seven hours of therapy. The eighth video covers a follow-up session one year later. The ninth video is a 20-year follow up and discussion of the long-term effectiveness of this therapy with Barry Guitar, Ph.D.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Diagnostic Interview
      (27:23-) Identification
      (1:12:59-) Desensitization
      (2:00:23-) Variations
      (2:42:22-) Modification/Cancellation
      (3:22:20-) Modification and Monitoring
      (4:12:30-) Stabilization
      (4:57:52-) One Year Follow-Up
      (5:26:11-) Twenty Year Follow-Up with Jeff and Dr. Barry Guitar

    • Decoding IDEA Eligibility (#6100)

      Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of The Florida State University, discusses concrete strategies for establishing eligibility for school-age children who stutter according to IDEA guidelines.

      Specific methods are described for documenting developmental, academic, and functional information for children who stutter. Then, applying evaluation data to determine adverse educational impact and the educational relevance of the child's stuttering problem is highlighted.

      Examples from various state standards are provided as well as a case study profiling a specific case. (1 hour 50 minutes)

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (01:21-) Case Study
      (11:30-) IDEA Overview
      (17:24-) Eligibility
      (23:23-) Strategies for Evaluating
      (24:25-) Developmental Information
      (27:02-) Tools for Gathering Developmental Information
      (28:41-) Academic Information (part 1)
      (33:46-) DIBELS
      (37:01-) Academic Information (Part 2)
      (40:21-) Iowa Core Curriculum Standards
      (42:14-) Virginia’s Standards of Learning
      (43:16-) Tools for Gathering Academic Information
      (45:16-) Functional Information
      (48:52-) Tools for Gathering Functional Information
      (51:11-) Functional Limitations Tables
      (1:03:30-) Documenting Confidence
      (1:16:35-) Other Assessment Tools
      (1:20:14-) Functional Limitation Table of Assertiveness
      (1:22:13-) Documenting Educational Relevance
      (1:26:36-) Determining Adverse Educational Impact
      (1:30:40-) Overall Functional Level for Fluency
      (1:33:02-) Case Study Profile
      (1:48:20-) Credits

    • EBP and PBE: Closing the Gap (#6720)

      Discussions about evidence-based practice often culminate in claims that there is one best approach to treatment of a particular type of client, or that we lack appropriate evidence or that clinicians lack access to what evidence we have.

      In this presentation, in an effort to frame these claims more positively, Dr. Nan Bernstein Ratner, Ed.D., argues that there is both research and common-sense evidence that these claims are wrong. She also suggests that in the debate about best practices in fluency treatment, there is indeed a need to search out and integrate many sources of evidence that either support our approach to a case or suggest a need for reconsideration, adjustment or change.

      Many options exist to find and use this evidence, and many more await implementation either in the clinic or in our research undertakings.

      This 55 minute talk provides a range of options for both clinical researchers and practicing clinicians who want to find, use and integrate evidence of treatment effectiveness.

      Dr. Ratner suggests some fruitful ways to frame further discussions on the topics of evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence to answer commonly posed questions about the effectiveness of what clinicians do.

      Filmed at the 9th Oxford Dysfluency Conference, St. Catherine's College, Oxford, UK, September 2011.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Tartamudez Para Niños, Por Niños - SPANISH (#9172)

      Conoce a Swish y sus amigos jovenes! Ellos hablan como lidiar con la burla y como ensenar a otros sobre la tartamudez. La animacion de cartones y ninos verdaderos que vienen a unirse ayudar a otros ninos que tartamudean unidos en este entretenido video de 12 minutos.

      Stuttering Foundation agradece a May International Productions y la terapeuta del habla Lisette Betancourt, M.A., CCC-SLP y Miami Children's Hospital sus contribuciones de trabajo que permetieron convertir este projecto en realidad.

    • Assessment and Treatment of Childhood Stuttering (#6200)

      Edward G. Conture, Ph.D., of Vanderbilt University, discusses current data-based approaches to the assessment and treatment of preschool children who stutter.

      Conture discusses current theoretical and clinical approaches to this population with supporting data that is based on more than 30 years of clinical and research experience.

      Specific attention is paid to emotional and speech-language contributions to early stuttering, means for considering emotional and speech-language behaviors during assessment and ways to apply this information to treatment.

      Several case studies are presented and discussed by the presenter and audience to arrive at an informed approach to the assessment and treatment of the young child who stutters and his/her family. (3 hours 36 minutes)

      (start time) TOPIC
      I. Overview: Assessment, Treatment and Theoretical Models of Developmental Stuttering
      a. (00:00-) Introduction
      b. (05:32-) Theoretical Models
      c. (27:11-) Case Study #1
      d. (32:30-) Notions & Urban Legends
      e. (37:15-) Possible trajectories of Developmental Stuttering
      f. (44:56-) Four Models: Theory, Assessment & Treatment
      g. (52:49-) Case Study #2
      II. Dual Diathesis Model
      a. (1:03:43-) Three Problems for All Models of Stuttering
      b. (1:05:52-) Possible Solution
      c. (1:23:01-) Secondary Behaviors
      e. (1:29:24-) Case Study #3
      f. (1:36:17-) The DD-S Model Briefly Deconstructed
      g. (1:36:31-) Speech-Language Diathesis
      h. (1:40:17-) Emotional Diathesis
      i. (1:47:45-) Stressors: Our Environment
      j. (1:58:11-) Case Study #4
      III. Some Evidence for the DD-S Model
      a. (2:06:23-) Some Evidence
      b. (2:11:24-) Deficiency Perspective
      c. (2:17:29-) Picture Naming Priming Experiments
      d. (2:23:38-) Three Clinical Cases
      e. (2:25:38-) Lexical/Semantic Priming
      f. (2:27:26-) Syntactic Prime Conditions
      g. (2:29:55-) Disassociations
      h. (2:35:32-) Sufficiency Perspective
      i. (2:35:55-) Clinical Example of Preschool CWS
      j. (2:36:53-) Emotional Processes
      k. (2:43:58-) Tests of Emotional Reactivity and Regulation
      l. (2:49:32-) Relation of E. Reactivity to E. Regulation
      m.(2:56:37-) Case Study #5
      IV. Speech-Language Interacts with Emotions
      a. (3:06:00-) Some Treatment Outcome Evidence
      b. (3:13:10-) Case Study #6
      V. Basic Assumptions Regarding Assessment of Childhood Stuttering
      a. (3:25:50-) Four Models: Theory, Assessment & Treatment
      b. (3:29:58-) Types of Speech Disfluency
      c. (3:31:04-) Disfluency Count Sheet
      d. (3:33:23-) Exacerbation
      e. (3:35:13-) Close

    • Moving from Assessment to Intervention Planning (#6300)

      This video provides viewers with a framework for developing interventions for preschool children who stutter and for their families.

      Using the 'Demands and Capacities' model to guide treatment planning, Sheryl Gottwald, Ph.D., CCC-SLP of the University of New Hampshire, identifies environmental variables to consider when constructing goals for the family.

      Likewise, Dr. Gottwald reviews the skill areas that contribute to fluency and highlights those areas that may benefit from child-directed early intervention sessions. The research presented in this 54-minute video supports these recommendations.

      Special thanks to Boston University and the Stuttering Foundation workshop attendees.

    • Basic Principles of Stuttering Therapy (#9080)

      Clinicians are still receiving training in the treatment of stuttering by the expert speech language pathologist, Hugo Gregory, Ph.D., through footage shot at Texas Christian University in 1998.

      This DVD is made possible through the tireless efforts of Carolyn Gregory, June Campbell, Diane Hill, Jennifer Watson, and Kristin Chmela. (52-minutes)

    • Using Williams' Normal Talking Approach (#6325)

      "Using Williams' Normal Talking Approach to Help Children Make Speech Change" will increase your confidence and flexibility in teaching students to modify their speech behavior!

      In this 153-minute video, filmed at the Stuttering Foundation's 2014 two-day conference on working with the school-aged child, Dr. Patricia Zebrowski describes how to teach children to make speech change using Dean Williams' Normal Talking Approach as a foundation. Then, Dr. Zebrowski reviews the various speech modification strategies clinicians can use with children who stutter, including what each technique is designed to change within the speech system and how to use apply the technique in therapy.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Stuttering: For Kids, By Kids - ENGLISH (#9182)

      Meet Swish and his young friends! They talk about stuttering, dealing with teasing, what helps, and how to teach others about stuttering.

      Cartoon animation and real children come together to help other kids who stutter in this lively and engaging 12-minute film.

      Produced by Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., The Florida State University and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont; with footage provided by Bill Murphy, M.A., Purdue University and Kristin Chmela, M.A., Northwestern University, in collaboration with Lee Caggiano, M.A., private practice, Joe Donaher, Ph.D., Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and Jane Fraser, Stuttering Foundation of America.

      Animation by the Computer Graphics Technology Department of Purdue University, with special thanks to Dr. Mark Bannatyne, Michelle Jackson, Helen Kang, Ali Modara, and Rich Sun.

    • Autism Spectrum Disorder and Stuttering (#6730)

      There has been increased interest in understanding the variety of speech disfluency patterns among those with autism spectrum disorders.

      Case studies that describe types of disfluencies have added to our knowledge base. While both stuttering and 'atypical' disfluencies (final part-word repetition) have been documented, many questions remain unanswered. What treatment methods are effective? What are the priorities for improved communication? What should we expect for positive functional outcomes?

      In this 2 hour presentation, Vivian Sisskin, M.S., CCC-SLP from the University of Maryland, summarizes the literature pertaining to disfluency in autism, and provides basic principles to aid in differential diagnosis and treatment planning.

      A case study, demonstrating effective treatment for final part-word repetitions, highlights a problem-solving approach to clinical management, using both learning style in autism and strategies from traditional fluency therapies.

      Filmed at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia during the Stuttering Foundation Mid-Atlantic Workshop, Philadelphia, PA, July 2012. Filmed and edited by Bob O'Brien, Video Design Productions, Inc., Lake Zurich, IL.

      Special thanks to Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D. and Joseph Donaher, Ph.D., and the 15 Stuttering Foundation Mid-Atlantic Workshop Attendees.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Stuttering: A Clinical Review of the Evidence (#6330)

      In this engaging 77-minute lecture, Dr. Joe Donaher of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, provides a framework for clinicians to view childhood stuttering from an evidence-based perspective. He presents the latest research in stuttering onset and development, genetics, neurophysiology, and speech motor control.

      He then helps clinicians understand how to apply this information to the children on their caseloads through the use of several case examples, emphasizing the importance of viewing each child as an individual and creating a strong therapeutic alliance.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Helping Children Change Thoughts & Feelings (#6335)

      For many children who stutter, successfully managing communication involves more than just changing speech. During this 2 hour 55 minute video, renowned clinician Vivian Sisskin, presents a multidimensional approach as a foundation to help children address the thoughts and feelings that sometimes co-exist with stuttering.

      She offers concrete strategies to help children become more mindful about their communication, to answer others' questions about what stuttering is and why they talk the way they do, and to recognize how their feelings influence their behavior.

      Additionally, she presents therapy ideas that will assist children in learning to stand up for themselves, to make active choices about speaking situations, plan actions they will take, and take risks.

      Recommendations for documentation and measurement are also provided.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Clinical Management of Chronic Stuttering (#9331)

      This 58-minute video features Eugene B. Cooper, Ph.D. and Hugo H. Gregory, Ph.D. in live footage from a 1984 conference, "Clinical Management of Chronic Stuttering."

      From the archives of the Stuttering Foundation, and despite some granular video quality, these two presentations are sure to enlighten a new generation of therapists.

    • Scoring Disfluencies (#6350)

      Many methods have been developed to count speech disfluencies, and in this 1-hour video, clinicians are trained to differentiate between various types of disfluencies, how to code them, and analyze the data accordingly.

      While this is just one aspect of a comprehensive fluency assessment, it is important to obtain reliable frequency measures for assessment purposes as well as to determine treatment effectiveness.

      After being trained in several methods, including Northwestern University's "Systematic Disfluency Analysis" (Campbell and Hill, 1987) and Vanderbilt University's disfluency counting method (Conture, 2001), Diane Parris, M.S., CCC-SLP, BRS-FD of Boston University demonstrates a pragmatic approach to scoring disfluencies using two case examples for practice.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (05:29-) How to Analyze a Speech Sample
      (07:11-) Scoring Disfluencies
      (14:19-) Case Study #1
      (21:39-) Scoring Transcript from Case Study
      (51:08-) Fluency Analysis
      (52:13-) Case Study #2
      (57:35-) Close

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Stuttering Modification Techniques (#9221)

      This single program combines five classic videotapes from the 1970's presenting clinician Dr. Harold Starbuck using his stuttering modification therapy techniques with a group of teens and young adults.

      Despite the scratchy audio track and grainy visual quality of the tapes, you will learn a great deal from Dr. Starbuck's lucid teaching style.

      "His demonstrations of each step of therapy using several individuals who stutter will make it possible for you to develop your own version of stuttering modification therapy from start to finish." - Barry Guitar, Ph.D.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Program 1: Identification and Analysis
      (41:05-) Program 2: The Process of Post-Block Correction
      (1:23:41-) Program 3: The Process of In-Block and Pre-Block Correction
      (2:07:57-) Program 4: Predetermined Speech, Dismissal and Transfer
      (2:47:24-) Program 5: Motivation

    • Counseling the Parents of Children Who Stutter (#9090)

      This 60-minute DVD featuring speech-language pathologist Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa, includes:

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Purpose of Presentation
      (01:33-) Recognizing & Understanding Emotions
      (11:46-) Parent Emotions
      (21:19-) Counseling Issues
      (35:29-) Confusion & Inadequacy
      (43:21-) Confusion & Anger

      It is an ideal tool for clinicians who work with the school-age child who stutters. The information and practical ideas encompassed in this film ensure that it will be a lasting source of help to school clinicians, parents, teachers and health care professionals.

    • Stuttering 101 (#9501)

      This 71-minute video, featuring speech-language pathologist Barry Guitar, Ph.D., is an ideal tool for clinicians who work with the school-age child who stutters.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (03:38-) What is Stuttering Modification?
      (06:37-) What is Fluency Shaping?
      Elements of Stuttering Modification
      (09:30-) A. Key Concepts
      B. Steps in Therapy
      (17:00-) 1. Exploring Stuttering
      (23:47-) 2. Modifying Stuttering in the Therapy Room
      (40:48-) 3. Transferring
      (44:56-) 4. Maintaining
      Elements of Fluency Shaping
      (46:55-) A. Key Concepts
      B. Steps in Therapy
      (50:58-) 1. Establish Fluency
      (52:05-) 2. Teaching Fluency Skills
      (1:06:26-) 3. Transferring Fluency
      (1:08:40-) 4. Maintaining Fluency
      (1:09:01-) Wrap-Up

      This video is part of a series of programs from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician."

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • The School Clinician: Ways to be More Effective (#9502)

      This 84-minute video features speech-language pathologist Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder and includes:

      - Teaching children to identify moments of stuttering
      - Sequencing therapy in a meaningful way
      - Developing transfer/maintenance skill

      It is an ideal tool for clinicians who work with the school-age child who stutters. Part of a series of tapes from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician."

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (08:04-) General Stuttering Info
      (14:17-) Intervention with Children Who Stutter
      (14:53-) a. Sample 1: Chloe
      (19:46-) b. Sample 2: Nikky
      (29:23-) c. Sample 3: Thomas
      (31:52-) Basic Principles Underlying Intervention with CWS
      (48:24-) Sample 4a: Christopher (9 years old)
      (54:58-) Samples 4b: Christopher (2 years later)
      (1:08:50-) Determining Whether Treatment is Recommended for Young Children
      (1:13:41-) Fiberoptic Laryngoscopy
      (1:24:17-) Close

    • Multidimensional Approach to Assessment & Treatment (#9503)

      This 73-minute video features speech-language pathologist E. Charles Healey, Ph.D., University of Nebraska.

      His presentation includes:
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (02:50-) Assumptions & Perspectives
      (04:25-) Some Recent Multidimensional Models of Stuttering
      (07:49-) Conceptual Framework for Our Model
      (08:26-) Our Multidimensional Model
      (09:37-) The CALMS Model of Stuttering
      (11:28-) The CALMS Rating Scale
      (30:30-) Case Study - Kyle
      (36:51-) Bridging the Gap Between Assessment & Treatment
      (38:41-) a. Cognitive Component Activities
      (50:53-) b. Affective Component Activities
      (53:42-) c. Linguistic Component Activities
      (59:59-) d. Motor Component Activities
      (1:06:03-) e. Social Component Activities
      (1:09:25-) Final Thoughts

      It is an ideal tool for clinicians who work with the school-age child who stutters. Part of a series of videos from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician." The information and practical ideas encompassed in this film ensure that it will be a lasting source of help to school clinicians, parents, teachers, and health care professionals.

    • Dealing Effectively with Attitudes and Emotions (#9504)

      This 79-minute video, featuring experienced speech-language pathologist Kristin Chmela, M.A., is an ideal tool for clinicians who work with the school-age child who stutters.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (12:34-) Attitudes & Emotions
      (18:43-) Dealing Effectively with Attitudes & Emotions
      (19:32-) Three Types of Counseling
      (21:35-) Listening & Valuing
      (25:15-) Who am I as a Clinician?
      (26:25-) What is My View of Stuttering?
      (27:25-) Ways to be More Effective
      (27:40-) a. Programs vs. Programs
      (29:18-) b. Create a Communicative Space
      (35:04-) c. Brush Up on Normal Development
      (46:48-) d. Study Your Skills
      (56:18-) e. Take Timed Risks
      (1:06:33-) f. Conceptualize Cognitive-Affective Topics
      (1:16:12-) g. Document Your Goals
      (1:16:39-) Wrap-Up

      Part of a series of videos from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician."

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Dealing with Guilt and Shame (#9505)

      This exciting video features Bill Murphy, M.A., Purdue University on how to cope with shame and guilt.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (07:20-) Why Worry About the Thoughts & Emotions of School-Age Children Who Stutter?
      (11:57-) The Goal
      (12:57-) The Stuttering Triangle
      (14:00-) Assessment Tools
      (22:35-) Paper & Pencil Tasks
      (25:12-) Portfolio Assessment
      (29:55-) Child Observation
      (30:54-) Therapy for Preventing/Reducing Negative Thoughts
      (31:37-) Shame vs. Guilt
      (45:00-) The Conspiracy of Easy Fluency
      (46:53-) Goals
      (49:18-) Islands of Competency
      (50:47-) Keys to Progress
      (51:40-) Two Approaches to Healthy Thoughts & Feelings
      (53:01-) Desensitization: Externalizing Stuttering (Level 1)
      (55:30-) Activities to Desensitize/Externalize
      (1:06:34-) Desensitization: Level 2
      (1:09:07-) More Desensitization Level 1 Examples
      (1:14:00-) Dealing with Bullying
      (1:23:47-) Let’s Talk to Your Class
      (1:27:35-) Closing Remarks

      Part of a series of programs from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician."

    • Stuttering Intervention for Teenagers (#9506)

      This 90-minute video, featuring speech-language pathologist Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., is an ideal tool for clinicians working with adolescents who stutter.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Stuttering Intervention for Teenagers
      (10:41-) Understanding Adolescence
      (18:37-) Getting to Know the Adolescent
      (33:02-) UI Program for Teens Who Stutter
      (35:38-) A. Motor Training & Mental Training
      B. Motor Training
      (37:15-) 1. Education
      (44:26-) 2. Behavioral Awareness
      (50:20-) 3. Problem Solving
      (59:40-) a. Fluency Skills
      (1:01:51-) b. Stuttering Modification
      (1:08:07-) 4. Relaxation
      C. Mental Training
      (1:10:04-) 1. Cognitive Restructuring
      (1:10:52-) 2. Automatic Thoughts
      (1:14:14-) 3. Identifying Automatic Thoughts
      (1:18:34-) 4. Tips from Athletes
      (1:25:24-) 5. Guided Imagery
      (1:28:00-) 6. Emotions Related to Stuttering

      Part of a series of programs from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician."

    • Cluttering (#9700)

      This 42-minute video demonstrates cluttering, and should help you work more effectively with children and adults who clutter.

      Chapters include:
      - Most common symptoms of cluttering
      - Coexisting problems with cluttering
      - Evaluation of cluttering
      - Treatment of cluttering

      Dynamic demonstration of cluttering therapy techniques by experts.

      Written and narrated by Florence L. Myers, Ph.D., Adelphi University; Kenneth O. St. Louis, Ph.D., West Virginia University.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    The Stuttering Foundation Library

    Browse our full selection of videos. Roll over the selections below to learn more about each title. All titles available with Instant Streaming. Purchase once, and own forever.

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    • The Development, Recovery & Persistence of Childhood Stuttering: The MDP Theory

      The Development, Recovery & Persistence of Childhood Stuttering: The MDP Theory

      Dr. Christine Weber writes, “Stuttering, or Childhood Onset Fluency Disorder (DSM-5), is a neurodevelopmental disorder that begins when neural networks supporting speech, language, and emotional functions are displaying rapid development. How does stuttering develop, and what factors influence the recovery or persistence of stuttering?  The Multifactorial Dynamic Pathways (MDP) theory of stuttering emphasizes the dynamic developmental context in which stuttering emerges and follows its progression throughout early childhood. It takes into account evidence from neural development to address how stuttering arises, including genetic/epigenetic factors, motor, language, and emotional features.  Evidence from our multi-factor experimental approach in young children who stutter supports our earlier assertion that while stuttering ultimately reflects differences in speech sensorimotor processes, its course over the life span is strongly influenced by language and emotional factors. Around the time of onset of stuttering, steep maturational changes in many neurobehavioral systems are ongoing, and critical interactions among these systems likely play a major role in determining persistence of or recovery from stuttering. From longitudinal evidence, we present findings that children who go on to persist in stuttering exhibit subtle maturational delays in speech-motor control and some aspects of language processing, and display more stuttering-like disfluencies (SLDs). In contrast, the preschool children who would eventually recover already showed signs of more stable speech motor control, greater maturity in some of their language processing systems, and less severe stuttering at that age. The MDP theory encourages experimental and clinical approaches that will help to determine the specific factors that contribute to each child’s pathway to the diagnosis of stuttering and those factors most likely to promote recovery. The implications of the MDP for early, comprehensive and tailored treatments for enhancing the pathways for recovery from stuttering will be discussed. This work is from the Purdue Stuttering Project which was supported by a grant from the NIH’s National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders, DC00559.”

    • Achieving Successful Behavior Change

      Achieving Successful Behavior Change

      Dr. Carmen Lefevre's presentation from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

      Dr. Lefevre writes," Gaining a clear understanding of a behaviour as well as its drivers and barriers is pivotal for successfully changing it. In the context of dysfluency, there are likely many different factors that influence the target behaviour (e.g. ‘speaking fluently’) and that need to each be understood and considered in the context of all other factors. Behavioural science provides methods for understanding behaviours and their influences, and for developing interventions that are most likely to be effective in their contexts. This talk will outline evidence-based principles of behaviour change and introduce a systematic method for designing interventions to change behaviour. This involves defining a clear target behaviour, conducting a behavioural analysis to identify the facilitators and barriers of the target behaviour, and identifying the most suitable behaviour change techniques for the context. The talk will illustrate how these principles and methods can be applied to a behaviour like stuttering using examples from previous work."

    • Desensitization with Parents

      Desensitization with Parents

      Elaine Kelman and Ali Berquez, both from the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children in London, present at the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

    • The Teenage Brain: Understanding Developmental Context

      The Teenage Brain: Understanding Developmental Context

      Dr. Catherine Sebastian's presentation from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

      Dr. Sebastian writes, "Adolescence is a key developmental window characterised by profound changes in cognitive, social and emotion skills. While the majority of young people negotiate the pressures of adolescence well, this stage of life is nonetheless characterised by an increase in risky behaviours, as well as in psychopathology associated with emotional dysregulation such as depression, anxiety and antisocial behaviour. Recent evidence suggests that ongoing brain development during this time of life may contribute to the onset or escalation of these symptoms and behaviours. This talk will review evidence showing ongoing brain development during the second decade of life, and will discuss links between brain development and adolescent behaviour. In particular, I will focus on processes supporting the ability to control our behaviours and emotions, and to understand others’ perspectives. Understanding these developmental processes may be helpful for clinicians working with this population in the context of dysfluency."

    • Bilingualism and Stuttering: Typical versus Clinical Speech Disfluency

      Bilingualism and Stuttering: Typical versus Clinical Speech Disfluency

      Dr. Courtney Byrd's presentation from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

      Dr. Byrd writes," Speech disfluencies provide valuable insight into the linguistic and motoric effort required for spoken communication. Expressions such as “second language fluency” and “word fluency” tasks reflect this concept. The types and frequencies of speech disfluencies children produce can be an index of language ability. Breakdowns in speech fluency are more likely when children attempt to produce utterances at the leading edge of their emerging linguistic capacity. Additionally, bilingual children appear to experience elevated levels of disfluency as they navigate multiple language systems, with potentially unequal levels of proficiency. Interestingly, there appears to be a critical behavioral overlap between what is considered typical and what is considered to be atypical in the disfluent speech among typically-developing monolingual and bilingual speakers and those speakers of one or more languages who present with a fluency disorder. This documented overlap makes it critical to determine if there are distinctive, qualitative and/or quantitative disfluent speech behaviors that differentiate language-typical mono-/bilingual children from matched peers with stuttering. The present talk will review the behaviors unique to stuttering in speakers of one or more language and the behaviors that overlap across typically fluent mono-/bilingual speakers and mono/bilingual speakers who stutter. From a theoretical perspective, identification of overlapping and distinguishing behaviors could serve to demonstrate the relative contributions of linguistic proficiency, linguistic planning, and speech motor control to fluency breakdowns in differing populations. From a clinical perspective, identification of behaviors that differentiate the behaviors characteristic of typical disfluency and stuttering in monolingual and bilingual speakers will enhance differential diagnosis across these speakers of one or more languages."

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • The Role of Attention in Therapy for Stuttering

      The Role of Attention in Therapy for Stuttering

      Jane Harley's presentation from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

      Ms. Harley writes, "My interest in the process of attention in stuttering therapy stems initially from a background in CBT and the information-processing theory and models which underpin CBT. These theoretical models propose that biases in what individuals attend to contribute to the mechanisms involved in uncomfortable human emotions such as anxiety. Our understanding of the nature and influence of attentional biases involved in social anxiety, emotional regulation, resilience and stuttering, is developing.

      The use of CBT in stuttering therapy is now main-stream. More recently, '3rd generation' or mindfulness-based approaches have developed within CBT and been applied in stuttering therapy. These approaches are also concerned with how information is attended to, based on the potential value of observing internal and external information that arises from a perspective of curiosity and acceptance. Attention processes are implicitly if not explicitly involved in other psychological approaches used in therapy for stuttering, such as Solution Focused Brief Therapy. Attention processes also impact in various ways in traditional fluency therapy and are involved in all interpersonal dynamics within therapy.

      My intention in this presentation is to explore selected aspects of the role played by attention within stuttering therapy. I will draw from theory and research from the fields of information-processing, mindfulness-based approaches and emotion-regulation, as well as clinical and qualitative accounts of the experience of stuttering."

    • Neurological Insights into Disfluent Speech Production: Challenges and Changes

      Neurological Insights into Disfluent Speech Production: Challenges and Changes

      Dr. Martin Sommer's presentation from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference 2017.

      Dr. Sommer writes, "Fluent speech is a fundamental prerequisite for social interaction in humans and a challenging task for the brain. Not all children acquire fluent speech; therefore stuttering persists after puberty in about 1 percent of adults. In recent years a broad range of technical innovations has allowed new insights into kinematics, underlying brain structure, brain function and the neurophysiology of fluent and dysfluent speech.

      Studying speech production is being improved by real-time very fast structural MR imaging observing the kinematics of articulators while speaking. This gives a substantiated insight into dysfluent speech patterns and will allow answering the question whether fluent sounding speech units are typically articulated in adults who stutter.

      A better insight into brain structure has been made possible by magnetic resonance imaging of water diffusion in the brain. It has uncovered a reduced integrity of white matter tracts, mostly in left inferior frontal areas. This has opened a whole new perspective to view stuttering as a speech area disconnection syndrome, and has motivated pioneering work from the Michigan group on longitudinal brain imaging studies in children who stutter.

      With its excellence time resolution, electroencephalography gives insight into the interplay of brain areas during speech preparation and shows an imbalanced timing of the activity of left hemispheric speech motor areas. The electrophysiological technique of transcranial magnetic stimulation enables investigating speech preparation with a very high time resolution, in order to assess speech preparatory processes of motor areas representing articulatory muscles. This allowed discovering an imperfect speech preparation in adults who stutter as a pathophysiological basis of dysfluent speech. It will allow differentiating a lack of facilitation from an excessive inhibition.

      Furthermore, transcranial magnetic stimulation gives a window on the hemispheric distribution of speech and non-speech related activations of articulatory muscles and as well as of hand muscles.

      In addition to technical advances, rare clinical cases on cerebellar lesions that modulate speech fluency further substantiate the structural basis of fluent and dysfluent speech production.

      Finally, refined questionnaires allow assessing the so-called anticipation of speech dysfluencies, which is the premonitory awareness that something is about to go wrong with speech fluency. We have assessed this in detail by deriving a questionnaire from Tourette’s syndrome to assess reliability and linguistic specificity of this premonitory awareness of dysfluencies in adults who stutter.

      Hence, the results of the last 20 years of research improve our understanding of dysfunctional nodes in speech networks, thereby refining and detailing current models of speech production. Beyond that, they expand future possibilities to study speech network modulation by therapy or external stimulation."

    • Graduate Instructor Bundle #1 ($40)

      Graduate Instructor Bundle #1 ($40)

      These five titles are included in this bundle for the price of four.

      1. Basic Clinical Skills
      2. Working with Preschoolers Who Stutter
      3. A Fresh Look at Stuttering
      4. Therapy in Action: The School-Age Child Who Stutters
      5. Sharpening Counseling Skills

    • Graduate Instructor Bundle #2 ($40)

      Graduate Instructor Bundle #2 ($40)

      These five titles are included in this bundle for the price of four.

      1. Stuttering: A Clinical Review of the Evidence
      2. Changing Thoughts & Feelings About Communication
      3. Avoidance Reduction Therapy
      4. Implementing Cognitive Behavior Therapy with School-Age Children
      5. Using Williams’ Normal Talking Approach to Help Children Make Speech Change

    • 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference Package ($60)

      11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference Package ($60)

      This package includes all seven presentations from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference for the price of six.

      Titles Included:
      1. The Development, Recovery & Persistence of Childhood Stuttering: The MDP Theory
      2. Achieving Successful Behavior Change
      3. Desensitization with Parents
      4. The Teenage Brain: Understanding Developmental Context
      5. Bilingualism & Stuttering: Typical vs. Clinical Speech Dysfluency
      6. The Role of Attention in Therapy for Stuttering
      7. Neurological Insights into Disfluent Speech Production: Challenges and Changes

    • Cluttering: Another Look (#9720)

      Cluttering: Another Look (#9720)

      In recent years, many advances have been made in understanding the communication disorder, cluttering.

      Kathleen Scaler Scott, Ph.D., of Misericordia University helps to clarify prior myths and explain recent research findings about cluttering. She presents the current lowest common denominator definition of cluttering and demonstrates how to apply this definition to assessment, differential diagnosis, and treatment.

      For clinicians who have been confused about how to identify, assess and treat cluttering, this 76-minute video provides practical strategies for understanding and managing complex clients.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Understanding New Genetic Findings in Stuttering (#6160)

      Understanding New Genetic Findings in Stuttering (#6160)

      In this 72-minute video, Dennis Drayna, Ph.D., of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, provides an update on recent research findings in the genetics of stuttering.

      This video describes the evidence for genetic factors in stuttering and the genes discovered to date. It discusses the function of these genes and what they tell us about the underlying causes of stuttering. It also discusses efforts to create an animal model for stuttering by putting human stuttering mutations into mice and analyzing their ultrasonic vocalizations.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Kids Who Stutter: Parents Speak (#0080)

      Kids Who Stutter: Parents Speak (#0080)

      In this 16 minute video, parents of children who stutter join a group of speech-language experts to talk compassionately and directly about what has worked for them as they interact with their child.

      The video features some of the world's leading hands-on therapists working with children who stutter: Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of The Florida State University's School of Communication Science and Disorders; Ellen Kelly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; speech-language consultants Frances Cook, MBE, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons), Cert CT (Oxford), Willie Botterill, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CT and Elaine Kelman, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CBT from the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children in London.

    • Alan Rabinowitz's Keynote Address at The Stuttering Foundation's 2005 2-Day Conference

      Alan Rabinowitz's Keynote Address at The Stuttering Foundation's 2005 2-Day Conference

      This Keynote presentation by renowned conservationist Alan Rabinowitz was given at the 2005 Stuttering Foundation two day workshop for school-based speech-language pathologists.

    • Alan Rabinowitz: Stuttering and the Big Cats (#6600)

      Alan Rabinowitz: Stuttering and the Big Cats (#6600)

      In this powerful hour-long presentation to young people who stutter, Alan Rabinowitz discusses how struggling with stuttering shaped his life and his long-time relationship with the endangered species he works to save.

      This intimate look inside the life of one of the world's greatest conservationists is sure to inspire.

      "Catching jaguars and tigers, negotiating with presidents and dictators - that's the easy stuff! The challenge for me has been living with the boy who'd come home from school every day and yearn for the darkness and safety of his closet." - Alan Rabinowitz

    • Basic Clinical Skills (#9600)

      Basic Clinical Skills (#9600)

      This 128-minute program demonstrates speech management strategies to help you work effectively with children and adults who stutter.

      Chapters include:
      - Exploring talking and stuttering
      - Identification
      - Explore stuttering
      - Explore change
      - Tools for change
      - Soft starts
      - Changing rate
      - Voluntary stuttering
      - Holding and tolerating the moment of stuttering
      - Pullouts
      - Cancellations
      - Making change durable
      - Transfer
      - Disclosure
      - Wrapping things up

      Dynamic demonstration of stuttering therapy techniques by experts from around the world:

      Ali Biggart, BA (Hons), MSc, Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London; Jane Fry, MSc (psych. Couns.), PGDip, CT (Oxford), Reg MRCSLT, Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London; Willie Botterill, MSc, MRCSLT, Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London; Frances Cook, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons), Cert CT (Oxford), Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London; Barry Guitar, Ph.D., University of Vermont; Alison Nicholas, MSc, MRCSLT, Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London;Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder; Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa. Additional footage provided by June Campbell, M.A., private practice.

      Produced by Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont, in collaboration with Jane Fraser, president of the Stuttering Foundation of America. Video production by Bob O'Brien, Video Design Productions, Inc., Lake Zurich, IL. English material captured by Luke Jeans.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Tools for Success: A Cognitive Behavior Therapy Taster (#9900)

      Tools for Success: A Cognitive Behavior Therapy Taster (#9900)

      Highlights from a workshop featuring Frances Cook, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons)Cert. CT (Oxford), and Willie Botterill, MSc, (Psych. Couns.), MRCSLT, provide insights into working with the cognitive aspects of stuttering.

      This 3 hour 45 minute "taster" into cognitive behavior therapy explores the interaction of thoughts, feelings, physical reactions and behaviors from the perspectives of children, parents and therapists.

      Ways to use the cognitive model are discussed and demonstrated.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      Laying the Groundwork for Success
      (04:04-) a. Exercise 1 - Meet Your Partner
      (09:21-) b. Exercise 2 - Best Hopes
      (11:09-) c. Best Hopes Analysis
      (20:22-) d. Where Are Your Now?
      (21:02-) e. Exercise 3 - Skills & Resources
      (24:05-) f. Skills & Resources Analysis
      Cognitive Behavior Therapy
      (31:39-) a. Overview
      (33:44-) b. Exercise 4 - Cognitive Therapy Model
      (43:02-) c. Using the Cognitive Therapy Model
      (44:15-) d. Therapeutic Alliance
      (46:02-) e. Characteristics of Cognitive Therapy
      (49:07-) f. Information Processing
      (53:30-) g. Appraisal & Anxiety
      Key Components of Therapy
      (59:35-) a. Overview
      (1:01:33-) b. Negative Automatic Thoughts
      (1:05:16-) c. Safety Behaviors
      (1:07:32-) d. Examples of the Vicious Circle
      Group CBT Video with Children
      (1:09:44-) a. Video
      (1:25:15-) b. Evaluation & Questions
      Group CBT Video with Parents
      (1:32:01-) a. Video
      (1:49:13-) b. Evaluation & Questions
      (1:58:44-) Cognitive Cycle for Families
      Steps in Therapy
      (2:10:19-) a. Practical Steps in Therapy
      (2:21:09-) b. Eliciting NATs
      (2:22:53-) c. Turn Questions into Statements
      (2:23:59-) d. Downward Arrow Catastrophic Thinking
      (2:25:47-) e. Identify Hot Thoughts
      (2:25:57-) f. Questions Therapists Ask
      (2:29:42-) g. Thought Record
      (2:39:14-) h. How to Identify NATs
      (2:40:36-) i. Working with NATs (Cognitive Reframing)
      (2:41:45-) j. Possible Directions
      (2:44:35-) k. More Questions Therapists Ask
      (2:46:20-) l. Unhelpful Thinking Patterns
      (2:58:21-) m. Socratic Questioning
      (3:00:06-) n. Behavioral Work/Experiments
      (3:02:07-) o. Problem Solving
      (3:12:17-) p. Problem Solving Steps
      (3:13:52-) q. Action Plans: Preparing for the Future
      (3:14:54-) r. Personal Action Plan
      Therapeutic Alliance
      (3:17:14-) a. Therapeutic Alliance
      (3:17:52-) b. Exercise 5 - Parent’s Vicious Cycle
      (3:19:39-) c. Evaluation & Questions
      (3:31:12-) d. Exercise 6 - Therapist’s Negative Cycles
      (3:33:16-) e. Evaluation & Questions
      (3:45:23-) Close

      Additional Therapy Footage includes Ali Berquez, MSc, MRCSLT Dip. CT (Oxford), Jane Fry, MSc (Psych. Couns).,MRCSLT., Dip.CT (Oxford), and Willie Botterill MSc, (Psych. Couns.), MRCSLT of the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London, England, and Jane Fraser, President, Stuttering Foundation, Memphis, TN.

      Special thanks to Boston University and Diane Fillion Parris, M.S., CCC-SLP, Boston University and the 20 Stuttering Foundation Workshop Attendees.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Solution Focused Brief Therapy Taster (#9950)

      Solution Focused Brief Therapy Taster (#9950)

      Highlights from a workshop providing insights into working with Solution-Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT) and stuttering.

      This "taster" introduces viewers to the principles and practice of SFBT, providing examples of children, parents, and teenagers describing their "best hopes" for the future, using scales to determine the skills and resources they already have to attain that future and identifying the small signs of change along the way.

      PART 1
      (00:00-) SFBT Introduction
      (04:23-) Best Hopes
      (26:39-) Exercise - Best Hopes

      PART 2
      (52:52-) Origins of SFBT
      (59:19-) The Essence of SFBT
      (1:12:20-) The Miracle Question
      (1:41:40-) Exercise - Miracle Question

      PART 3
      (1:53:06-) SFBT Recap
      (1:58:48-) Overview of Opening & Subsequent Sessions
      (2:04:35-) Challenges
      (2:06:48-) References
      (2:08:07-) Using Scales with Children
      (2:22:24-) Using Scales with Parents
      (2:35:37-) Exercise - Using Scales

      PART 4
      (2:48:56-) Closing the Session
      (2:56:14-) Follow-Up During Subsequent Sessions
      (3:04:26-) Using Scales in Follow-ups
      (3:21:40-) Close

      Produced by the Stuttering Foundation, the 3 hour 30 minute video features Willie Botterill, MSc, (Psych. Couns.), MRCSLT, and Frances Cook, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons)Cert. CT(Oxford). Additional Therapy Footage includes Willie Botterill MSc, (Psych. Couns.), MRCSLT of the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London, England. Special thanks to Boston University and Diane Fillion Parris, M.S., CCC-SLP, Boston University and the 20 Stuttering Foundation Workshop Attendees.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • For Kids, By Kids: All Grown Up (#6345)

      For Kids, By Kids: All Grown Up (#6345)

      This 20-minute video, hosted by Kristin A. Chmela, M.A., provides insight into the lives of four young adults, who 11 years earlier, were highlighted in the Stuttering Foundation's best selling video, "For Kids By Kids."

      In this inspiring new video, three common threads emerge as we hear Naomi, Daniel, Umang, and Tommy share their stories about growing up with stuttering.

      "I have imagined my son in a box, not knowing how he was going to move forward because of his stuttering. Watching this DVD made me realize he is going to be OK." -- Parent of 16-year-old who stutters.

    • A Fresh Look at Stuttering (#4083)

      A Fresh Look at Stuttering (#4083)

      "Wanting to be someone else is a waste of the person you are." This quote, attributed to both Marilyn Monroe and Kurt Cobain, may not resonate for someone who has spent most of his or her life desperately trying to hide stuttering.

      Daily exhaustion from changing words, making excuses, timing interactions, and getting others to do the talking leads to much more than frustration. The life impact from stuttering can affect confidence, spontaneity, job performance, and social interactions. Yet, the wish to be "fluent" often outweighs the freedom to communicate and the desire to make human connection.

      This 23-minute video follows adults who stutter through their gradual, emotional transformation. They discover the paradox that by accepting and embracing their stuttering rather than hiding it they achieve more fluent communication. They share their personal insights, successes and failures, and the sources of the courage they mustered in order to face fear, step out of their comfort zone, and accept themselves as they are.

      A film for adults and teens!

    • Working with PreSchoolers Who Stutter (#0162)

      Working with PreSchoolers Who Stutter (#0162)

      Improve your ability to successfully treat stuttering in preschoolers. This one hour and 45 minute video offers comprehensive and practical strategies for working with young children:

      - a multidimensional approach to the assessment and treatment of preschoolers
      - guidelines based on new research on when to provide treatment
      - practical strategies to use in therapy
      - a structured approach to involve parents in the process.

      Demonstrations help you see and successfully model easy relaxed speech. The video includes excerpts with parents sharing their personal stories about being involved in treatment.

      Featuring Kristin Chmela, M.A., speech-language pathologist and Board Recognized Specialist in Fluency Disorders. Produced by the Stuttering Foundation.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • David Seidler - We Have a Voice (#6650)

      David Seidler - We Have a Voice (#6650)

      Academy award-winning screenwriter of The King's Speech, David Seidler, inspires young people who stutter in this marvelous hour-long presentation.

      In an eloquent keynote address, followed by a question and answer session, Seidler discusses how his own struggle with stuttering led him to admire King George VI whose radio addresses moved him as a child and led to his desire to share the King's story.

      Viewers of all ages will enjoy learning more about the man who wrote the screenplay that captivated the stuttering community and the world.

    • Parent Counseling: Conversations with David Luterman - Parts 1 & 2 (#6400)

      Parent Counseling: Conversations with David Luterman - Parts 1 & 2 (#6400)

      In this insightful, two-part program, sit in the room with master clinician, David Luterman, as he counsels parents of children who stutter. Then, eavesdrop on his discussion of the session with practicing clinicians.

      Part 1 is Group Therapy with Parents (1 hour); and Part 2 is Therapists' Review of Parent Session (1 hour).

      Viewers will witness these interactions, seldom seen.

      Special thanks to David M. Luterman, D.Ed., Professor Emeritus, Emerson College, Boston, and Director, Thayer Lindsey Family-Centered Nursery for Hearing Impaired Children; Diane Fillion Parris, M.S., Boston University; and the parent and clinician group.

    • 7 Tips for Talking with the Child Who Stutters (#0075)

      7 Tips for Talking with the Child Who Stutters (#0075)

      In this 16 minute video, a group of speech-language experts talk compassionately and directly to adults about how to promote easier talking as they interact with their preschool-age children. The professionals offer simple, easy-to-do tips that parents can begin to use immediately.

      The video features some of the world's leading hands-on therapists working with preschool children who stutter.

      They include: Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of The Florida State University's School of Communication Science and Disorders; Ellen Kelly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; speech-language consultants Frances Cook, MBE, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons), Cert CT (Oxford), Willie Botterill, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CT and Elaine Kelman, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CBT from the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children in London.

    • 7 Consejos para Hablar con el Niño que Tartamudez (#0075)

      7 Consejos para Hablar con el Niño que Tartamudez (#0075)

      In this 16 minute video, a group of speech-language experts talk compassionately and directly to adults about how to promote easier talking as they interact with their preschool-age children. The professionals offer simple, easy-to-do tips that parents can begin to use immediately.

      The video features some of the world's leading hands-on therapists working with preschool children who stutter.

      They include: Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of The Florida State University's School of Communication Science and Disorders; Ellen Kelly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; speech-language consultants Frances Cook, MBE, MSc, MRCSLT (Hons), Cert CT (Oxford), Willie Botterill, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CT and Elaine Kelman, MSc, MRCSLT, Cert CBT from the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children in London.

    • La Tartamudez y Su Niño (#0073)

      La Tartamudez y Su Niño (#0073)

      A esta video se le pueden dar muchos usos. Se puede utilizar con familias en que un niño tartamudea, con terapeutas del habla que van a tratar a niños de edad preescolar y en las escuelas, universidades, centros de tratamiento y hospitales.

      Producido por Barry Guitar, Ph.D., Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., de la Universidad de Vermont, en collaboracion con Jane Fraser, presidente de la Stuttering Foundation, Diane Hill, M.A., Northwestern Universidad, Peter Ramig, Ph.D., Universidad de Colorado, y Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., de la Universidad de Iowa.

      The Stuttering Foundation agradece a Miami Children's Hospital, May Productions, la terapeuta del habla Lisette M. Betancourt, M.A., Ava Osle de Radio Lollipop, Henry Postigo, Nora Barriere, y Isidoro Zarco, M.D., sus contribuciones de trabajo, que permitieron convertir este projecto en realidad.

    • Stuttering: Straight Talk for Teachers (#0126)

      Stuttering: Straight Talk for Teachers (#0126)

      In this powerful 18-minute video, students who stutter talk to teachers about their experiences and experts in the field of speech pathology answer questions about what works and what doesn't in the classroom.

      A perfect length for an after-school inservice or short enough for a teacher to watch alone. The video answers common questions:

      - how to respond to the child who stutters in the classroom
      - what happens in speech therapy
      - how to handle teasing
      - how to deal with oral presentations

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction & Facts about Stuttering
      (02:11-) Examples of Stuttering
      (02:47-) How Children Feel about Stuttering
      (03:55-) Academic and Social Impacts
      (05:36-) What to Do When a Student Stutters
      (06:22-) Speech Tools
      (07:52-) What to Do about a Difficult Speaking Day
      (09:34-) What to Do about Interrupting
      (09:59-) What to Do about Oral Presentations
      (11:16-) Talking to the Entire Class about Stuttering
      (12:21-) How to Handle Teasing
      (13:48-) How to Encourage a Child to Participate in Class
      (14:11-) Speech Therapy for Stuttering
      (16:29-) Close

      Produced by: Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., The Florida State University and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont; in collaboration with Kristin Chmela, M.A., Northwestern University; Jane Fraser, president, The Stuttering Foundation; and Bill Murphy, M.A., Purdue University.

      Additional footage provided by: Barry Guitar, Ph.D., University of Vermont; Diane Hill, M.A., Northwestern University; Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder; and Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa.

    • Stuttering: Advice From The Heart For the Parents of Children and Teens Who Stutter (#6550)

      Stuttering: Advice From The Heart For the Parents of Children and Teens Who Stutter (#6550)

      Fluency specialist, Kristin Chmela, M.A., CCC-SLP, talks to parents of children and teenagers who stutter, drawing upon her own experiences not only as a person who stutters but also as a parent, therapist, and teacher.

      Chmela urges parents to see each child as a gift; she also asks parents to consider several important guidelines as they rear a child who stutters.

      This 45-minute presentation was filmed live at the annual convention of Friends; The Association of Young People Who Stutter.

      Special thanks to Friends and its director Lee Caggiano, M.A., CCC-SLP.

      "This is one of the most powerful closing speeches I have ever seen. I felt like I was part of the audience and highly recommend others getting this DVD if not for themselves then for group settings. I know I'll be using it!" Voon Keong Pang, Stuttering Treatment & Research Trust-New Zealand

    • The Genius of Dean Williams (#0425)

      The Genius of Dean Williams (#0425)

      Gene Williams, a renowned authority on stuttering, has a unique philosophy and approach to stuttering therapy. This video provides classic footage of Dean working with a child who stutters.

      Dean believed that stuttering behavior in school children and adults is the result of their trying not to stutter. They struggle and tense up to avoid repetitions, prolongations, and blocks. However, these behaviors are more under their control than they realize. Dean's approach was to help his clients discover that they could change their behavior and learn to speak more easily.

      This video of him helping a young boy speak more easily can teach you how you can use this approach with your own clients. Try it!

    • Counseling: Listening To and Talking With Parents of Children Who Stutter (#9122)

      Counseling: Listening To and Talking With Parents of Children Who Stutter (#9122)

      Parents play a key role in the treatment of children who stutter. Helping them recognize and cope with their own feelings about their child's stuttering is critical to success in therapy.

      In this 50-minute video, noted clinicians demonstrate and discuss strategies for counseling parents in all stages of the treatment process as the parent-clinician relationship develops.

      In this video, you will see key techniques for handling these and other situations demonstrated in actual counseling sessions, followed by expert analysis and advice on tactics you can employ.

      Topics Include:
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (02:45-) The First Contact
      (04:37-) The Initial Interview
      (15:11-) Counseling Both Parents
      (22:07-) Dealing with Fear and Resistance
      (29:31-) Later in the Process
      (36:36-) Working with a Group
      (42:45-) Close

      Produced by Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa; Barry Guitar, Ph.D., University of Vermont; and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont; in collaboration with Diane Hill, M.A., Northwestern University; Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder; and Jane Fraser, President of The Stuttering Foundation.

    • Stuttering and Your Child: Help for Parents (#0073)

      Stuttering and Your Child: Help for Parents (#0073)

      This 30 minute video is for parents and families of young children who stutter. (Formerly entitled: Stuttering and the Preschool Child) The focus is to help families understand stuttering and make changes to promote more fluent speech.

      - for parents whose child is stuttering.
      - for speech-language pathologists working with young
      children.
      - and for school, clinic, university, and hospital settings.

      "...this is perhaps the best buy in the nation for information on children and stuttering." ASHA Journal book review

      Produced by Barry Guitar, Ph.D. and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S. of the University of Vermont; in collaboration with Jane Fraser, Stuttering Foundation; Diane Hill, M.A., Northwestern University; Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder; Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa. Additional footage from Kristin A. Chmela, M.A., Northwestern University.

    • Stuttering: Straight Talk for Teens (#1076)

      Stuttering: Straight Talk for Teens (#1076)

      The teen years are full of challenges. For teens who stutter, it can also be a lonely time. They need to know that they are not alone - and that real help is available.

      In this 30-minute video, teens share their experiences of stuttering and talk about what works for them. Narrated by high school student David Wilkins, who stutters himself, Stuttering: Straight Talk for Teens provides forthright information and advice on managing stuttering in academic and social settings. Noted clinicians demonstrate helpful techniques and discuss:

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) What causes stuttering
      (03:28-) Is there something wrong with you?
      (07:22-) Feelings you may have
      (08:39-) It’s not unusual to feel different
      (10:16-) How stuttering affected David and Amanda
      (12:09-) Feeling different and rejected
      (13:16-) Sometimes people don’t understand
      (13:59-) Reactions to teasing
      (14:43-) The feeling of panic
      (15:53-) Take all the time you need
      (17:24-) Feelings of frustration
      (18:48-) There is help
      (23:35-) Pushing and tension of stuttering
      (25:58-) Don’t avoid embarrassment or fear
      (28:43-) Resist time pressure
      (30:20-) Stuttering Foundation Publications

      This video is an excellent resource for teens and adults, their families, teachers, physicians, and speech-language pathologists.

      Produced by Barry Guitar, Ph.D., and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont; Edward G. Conture, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University; Jane Fraser, Stuttering Foundation; Hugo H. Gregory, Ph.D., Northwestern University; and Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder.

    • If You Stutter: Advice for Adults (#1083)

      If You Stutter: Advice for Adults (#1083)

      An over 50-minute video on stuttering for adults who stutter, their families, and the professionals who work with them. Those who stutter share their personal stories and insights into what has helped them.

      Speech-language pathologists answer questions about stuttering and demonstrate a variety of therapy techniques, including:

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) What causes stuttering
      (04:52-) More men stutter than women
      (06:21-) If stuttering runs in the family…
      (07:02-) Does intelligence play a role?
      (08:00-) Is stuttering a psychological problem?
      (08:56-) Good and bad days of stuttering
      (09:41-) “Just relax.”
      (10:28-) People don’t stutter while singing
      (11:34-) “I’ve had therapy before…”
      (12:30-) Therapy
      (14:30-) Using a videotape as a tool
      (15:27-) Study your overall speech
      (18:10-) Attitudes and emotions
      (25:37-) Modification
      (41:53-) Transfer
      (47:57-) Maintenance and follow up
      (52:31-) Credits

      The broad range of perspectives and depth of information in this video ensure that it will be a lasting source of inspiration to those who stutter.

      Produced by: Barry Guitar, Ph.D. and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont; in collaboration with Jane Fraser, president, Stuttering Foundation; Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado; Hugo H. Gregory, Ph.D., Northwestern University. Narrated by June Haerle Campbell, M.A., Northwestern University. Additional footage provided by Deborah Kully, M.S., ISTAR, and Catherine Montgomery, M.S., AIS.

    • Avoidance Reduction Therapy in a Group Setting (#6740)

      Avoidance Reduction Therapy in a Group Setting (#6740)

      The roots of Avoidance Reduction Therapy for Stuttering are found in the pioneering work of the late Joseph Sheehan, a professor of psychology at UCLA, and his wife Vivian Sheehan, a Los Angeles-based speech pathologist. The Sheehans applied concepts from conflict theory and role theory to formulate an explanation for the behaviors and paradoxes we observe in those who stutter.

      They described stuttering as an "approach-avoidance conflict," whereby competing desires to both speak and hold back from speaking result in (1) maladaptive reactive behaviors that interfere with communication, and (2) "mental gymnastics" that limit participation in daily life.

      In this 2-hour video, Vivian Sisskin, M.S., CCC-SLP from the University of Maryland, walks clinicians through methods of group therapy while providing the nuts and bolts of Avoidance Reduction Therapy.

      Sisskin, mentored by the Sheehans early in her career, outlines the basic principles, goals of treatment, and therapeutic strategies of her treatment program for stuttering.

      This presentation serves as both a tutorial for speech-language pathologists and a self-help primer for those who stutter. Activities and video demonstrations provide ideas for activities and assignments that lead to spontaneous, forward-moving communication, free of control.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Neurophysiology of Stuttering -Oxford 2011 (#6710)

      Neurophysiology of Stuttering -Oxford 2011 (#6710)

      Neurophysiology studies the function of the central and the peripheral nervous system through the recording of bioelectrical activity, whether it is spontaneous or stimulated.

      During this 50 minute presentation, Martin Sommer, M.D., gives an overview of essential neurophysiological findings that improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of stuttering.

      Recorded live at the 2011 Oxford Dysfluency Conference in England.

    • Implementing CBT with School-age Children (#6500)

      Implementing CBT with School-age Children (#6500)

      Cognitive-behavioral therapy is one approach for helping children change their thoughts and feelings about stuttering. These changes can lead to better therapy outcomes as children develop coping strategies, test their beliefs about listener reactions, and take risks like using speech tools in front of others.

      In this 1 hour, 40 minute video, clinicians learn why unhelpful thoughts and feelings can interfere with stuttering therapy and then how to help children begin to make changes.

      Extending the information presented in the Stuttering Foundation's program 9900, "A Cognitive Behavior Therapy Taster," Lisa Scott, Ph.D. of The Florida State University, presents concrete therapy activities for helping children learn to cope with difficult speaking situations, identify unhelpful thoughts, and strategies for trying out new thoughts and behaviors.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (05:51-) The Cognitive Model
      (06:55-) Why is it so hard to help children achieve speech change?
      (10:27-) Possible Painful Experiences for CWS
      (11:53-) Unhelpful Thinking Patterns
      (17:09-) The Problem of Avoidance
      (22:46-) Reducing Barriers to Changes
      (27:52-) Strategy: Connecting Thoughts & Feelings
      (56:57-) CSQ - Coping Strategies Questionnaire
      (1:04:22-) Strategy: Behavioral Experiments
      (1:13:07-) Strategy: Identifying Supports
      (1:17:17-) Strategy: Increasing Coping Skills
      (1:25:33-) Strategy: Behavioral Activation
      (1:38:04-) Credits

      Special thanks to the University of Iowa, The Florida State University, Stuttering Foundation workshop participants, and Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • The School-age Child Who Stutters (#1079)

      The School-age Child Who Stutters (#1079)

      This 38-minute video is an excellent resource and teaching tool for speech-language pathologists as well as teachers, parents, and physicians.

      Certain to further the understanding of stuttering and what can be done to help the school-age child, this DVD provides information about:

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (01:39-) Monosyllabic whole-word repetitions
      (02:31-) Repetition of sounds and syllables
      (03:12-) Examples of sound prolongations
      (03:58-) Blocks
      (05:21-) Understanding a child’s feelings and beliefs
      (12:07-) Treatment
      (19:33)- Modification
      (30:03-) Transfer
      (35:32-) Closing

      ASHA Journal review says, "Speech-language pathologists, teachers, parents, and physicians will find this video helpful. It will be useful as in-service presentations as well as a take home tape for parents. In many cases, it will also be helpful for the child to view the tape. This is the kind of video that you will want to keep several copies of on hand so you won't have to loan or give away your last copy."

      Produced by: Edward G. Conture, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, Barry Guitar, Ph.D., University of Vermont, Jane Fraser, Stuttering Foundation, June H. Campbell,M.A., Northwestern University, Hugo H. Gregory,Ph.D., Northwestern University, Peter Ramig, Ph.D. University of Colorado-Boulder, and Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa.

    • Sharpening Counseling Skills (#9800)

      Sharpening Counseling Skills (#9800)

      This exciting 3 hour program features renowned audiologist and expert counselor, David M. Luterman, D.Ed.

      Luterman's philosophy of counseling centers around deep listening and silent witnessing of our clients' stories and concerns as we refrain from providing immediate advice, information, or solutions.

      We believe that this film is an important tool for all those in the helping professions.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • ADHD and Children Who Stutter (#6700)

      ADHD and Children Who Stutter (#6700)

      Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopment disorder characterized by reduced attention, increased impulsivity and increased hyperactivity. Speech-language pathologists must consider the impact that ADHD traits can have on an individual's ability to efficiently and fluently communicate.

      In this 54-minute film, Joseph Donaher, Ph.D., CCC-SLP of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, introduces the clinical characteristics of ADHD, the literature on stuttering and ADHD, and clinical management accommodations that may improve therapeutic outcomes for children who stutter who present with coexisting attention and focusing concerns.

      Filmed at the 9th Oxford Dysfluency Conference, St. Catherine's College, Oxford, UK, September 2011.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Therapy in Action - Dr. Charles Van Riper (#1080)

      Therapy in Action - Dr. Charles Van Riper (#1080)

      One of the all time greats in action!

      This classic series of nine films together in one video shows Dr. Charles Van Riper of Western Michigan University working with an adult who stutters. Therapy was done in seven sessions - one week apart - a total of seven hours of therapy. The eighth video covers a follow-up session one year later. The ninth video is a 20-year follow up and discussion of the long-term effectiveness of this therapy with Barry Guitar, Ph.D.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Diagnostic Interview
      (27:23-) Identification
      (1:12:59-) Desensitization
      (2:00:23-) Variations
      (2:42:22-) Modification/Cancellation
      (3:22:20-) Modification and Monitoring
      (4:12:30-) Stabilization
      (4:57:52-) One Year Follow-Up
      (5:26:11-) Twenty Year Follow-Up with Jeff and Dr. Barry Guitar

    • Decoding IDEA Eligibility (#6100)

      Decoding IDEA Eligibility (#6100)

      Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, of The Florida State University, discusses concrete strategies for establishing eligibility for school-age children who stutter according to IDEA guidelines.

      Specific methods are described for documenting developmental, academic, and functional information for children who stutter. Then, applying evaluation data to determine adverse educational impact and the educational relevance of the child's stuttering problem is highlighted.

      Examples from various state standards are provided as well as a case study profiling a specific case. (1 hour 50 minutes)

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (01:21-) Case Study
      (11:30-) IDEA Overview
      (17:24-) Eligibility
      (23:23-) Strategies for Evaluating
      (24:25-) Developmental Information
      (27:02-) Tools for Gathering Developmental Information
      (28:41-) Academic Information (part 1)
      (33:46-) DIBELS
      (37:01-) Academic Information (Part 2)
      (40:21-) Iowa Core Curriculum Standards
      (42:14-) Virginia’s Standards of Learning
      (43:16-) Tools for Gathering Academic Information
      (45:16-) Functional Information
      (48:52-) Tools for Gathering Functional Information
      (51:11-) Functional Limitations Tables
      (1:03:30-) Documenting Confidence
      (1:16:35-) Other Assessment Tools
      (1:20:14-) Functional Limitation Table of Assertiveness
      (1:22:13-) Documenting Educational Relevance
      (1:26:36-) Determining Adverse Educational Impact
      (1:30:40-) Overall Functional Level for Fluency
      (1:33:02-) Case Study Profile
      (1:48:20-) Credits

    • EBP and PBE: Closing the Gap (#6720)

      EBP and PBE: Closing the Gap (#6720)

      Discussions about evidence-based practice often culminate in claims that there is one best approach to treatment of a particular type of client, or that we lack appropriate evidence or that clinicians lack access to what evidence we have.

      In this presentation, in an effort to frame these claims more positively, Dr. Nan Bernstein Ratner, Ed.D., argues that there is both research and common-sense evidence that these claims are wrong. She also suggests that in the debate about best practices in fluency treatment, there is indeed a need to search out and integrate many sources of evidence that either support our approach to a case or suggest a need for reconsideration, adjustment or change.

      Many options exist to find and use this evidence, and many more await implementation either in the clinic or in our research undertakings.

      This 55 minute talk provides a range of options for both clinical researchers and practicing clinicians who want to find, use and integrate evidence of treatment effectiveness.

      Dr. Ratner suggests some fruitful ways to frame further discussions on the topics of evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence to answer commonly posed questions about the effectiveness of what clinicians do.

      Filmed at the 9th Oxford Dysfluency Conference, St. Catherine's College, Oxford, UK, September 2011.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Tartamudez Para Niños, Por Niños - SPANISH (#9172)

      Tartamudez Para Niños, Por Niños - SPANISH (#9172)

      Conoce a Swish y sus amigos jovenes! Ellos hablan como lidiar con la burla y como ensenar a otros sobre la tartamudez. La animacion de cartones y ninos verdaderos que vienen a unirse ayudar a otros ninos que tartamudean unidos en este entretenido video de 12 minutos.

      Stuttering Foundation agradece a May International Productions y la terapeuta del habla Lisette Betancourt, M.A., CCC-SLP y Miami Children's Hospital sus contribuciones de trabajo que permetieron convertir este projecto en realidad.

    • Assessment and Treatment of Childhood Stuttering (#6200)

      Assessment and Treatment of Childhood Stuttering (#6200)

      Edward G. Conture, Ph.D., of Vanderbilt University, discusses current data-based approaches to the assessment and treatment of preschool children who stutter.

      Conture discusses current theoretical and clinical approaches to this population with supporting data that is based on more than 30 years of clinical and research experience.

      Specific attention is paid to emotional and speech-language contributions to early stuttering, means for considering emotional and speech-language behaviors during assessment and ways to apply this information to treatment.

      Several case studies are presented and discussed by the presenter and audience to arrive at an informed approach to the assessment and treatment of the young child who stutters and his/her family. (3 hours 36 minutes)

      (start time) TOPIC
      I. Overview: Assessment, Treatment and Theoretical Models of Developmental Stuttering
      a. (00:00-) Introduction
      b. (05:32-) Theoretical Models
      c. (27:11-) Case Study #1
      d. (32:30-) Notions & Urban Legends
      e. (37:15-) Possible trajectories of Developmental Stuttering
      f. (44:56-) Four Models: Theory, Assessment & Treatment
      g. (52:49-) Case Study #2
      II. Dual Diathesis Model
      a. (1:03:43-) Three Problems for All Models of Stuttering
      b. (1:05:52-) Possible Solution
      c. (1:23:01-) Secondary Behaviors
      e. (1:29:24-) Case Study #3
      f. (1:36:17-) The DD-S Model Briefly Deconstructed
      g. (1:36:31-) Speech-Language Diathesis
      h. (1:40:17-) Emotional Diathesis
      i. (1:47:45-) Stressors: Our Environment
      j. (1:58:11-) Case Study #4
      III. Some Evidence for the DD-S Model
      a. (2:06:23-) Some Evidence
      b. (2:11:24-) Deficiency Perspective
      c. (2:17:29-) Picture Naming Priming Experiments
      d. (2:23:38-) Three Clinical Cases
      e. (2:25:38-) Lexical/Semantic Priming
      f. (2:27:26-) Syntactic Prime Conditions
      g. (2:29:55-) Disassociations
      h. (2:35:32-) Sufficiency Perspective
      i. (2:35:55-) Clinical Example of Preschool CWS
      j. (2:36:53-) Emotional Processes
      k. (2:43:58-) Tests of Emotional Reactivity and Regulation
      l. (2:49:32-) Relation of E. Reactivity to E. Regulation
      m.(2:56:37-) Case Study #5
      IV. Speech-Language Interacts with Emotions
      a. (3:06:00-) Some Treatment Outcome Evidence
      b. (3:13:10-) Case Study #6
      V. Basic Assumptions Regarding Assessment of Childhood Stuttering
      a. (3:25:50-) Four Models: Theory, Assessment & Treatment
      b. (3:29:58-) Types of Speech Disfluency
      c. (3:31:04-) Disfluency Count Sheet
      d. (3:33:23-) Exacerbation
      e. (3:35:13-) Close

    • Moving from Assessment to Intervention Planning (#6300)

      Moving from Assessment to Intervention Planning (#6300)

      This video provides viewers with a framework for developing interventions for preschool children who stutter and for their families.

      Using the 'Demands and Capacities' model to guide treatment planning, Sheryl Gottwald, Ph.D., CCC-SLP of the University of New Hampshire, identifies environmental variables to consider when constructing goals for the family.

      Likewise, Dr. Gottwald reviews the skill areas that contribute to fluency and highlights those areas that may benefit from child-directed early intervention sessions. The research presented in this 54-minute video supports these recommendations.

      Special thanks to Boston University and the Stuttering Foundation workshop attendees.

    • Basic Principles of Stuttering Therapy (#9080)

      Basic Principles of Stuttering Therapy (#9080)

      Clinicians are still receiving training in the treatment of stuttering by the expert speech language pathologist, Hugo Gregory, Ph.D., through footage shot at Texas Christian University in 1998.

      This DVD is made possible through the tireless efforts of Carolyn Gregory, June Campbell, Diane Hill, Jennifer Watson, and Kristin Chmela. (52-minutes)

    • Using Williams' Normal Talking Approach (#6325)

      Using Williams' Normal Talking Approach (#6325)

      "Using Williams' Normal Talking Approach to Help Children Make Speech Change" will increase your confidence and flexibility in teaching students to modify their speech behavior!

      In this 153-minute video, filmed at the Stuttering Foundation's 2014 two-day conference on working with the school-aged child, Dr. Patricia Zebrowski describes how to teach children to make speech change using Dean Williams' Normal Talking Approach as a foundation. Then, Dr. Zebrowski reviews the various speech modification strategies clinicians can use with children who stutter, including what each technique is designed to change within the speech system and how to use apply the technique in therapy.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Stuttering: For Kids, By Kids - ENGLISH (#9182)

      Stuttering: For Kids, By Kids - ENGLISH (#9182)

      Meet Swish and his young friends! They talk about stuttering, dealing with teasing, what helps, and how to teach others about stuttering.

      Cartoon animation and real children come together to help other kids who stutter in this lively and engaging 12-minute film.

      Produced by Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D., The Florida State University and Carroll Guitar, M.L.S., University of Vermont; with footage provided by Bill Murphy, M.A., Purdue University and Kristin Chmela, M.A., Northwestern University, in collaboration with Lee Caggiano, M.A., private practice, Joe Donaher, Ph.D., Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and Jane Fraser, Stuttering Foundation of America.

      Animation by the Computer Graphics Technology Department of Purdue University, with special thanks to Dr. Mark Bannatyne, Michelle Jackson, Helen Kang, Ali Modara, and Rich Sun.

    • Autism Spectrum Disorder and Stuttering (#6730)

      Autism Spectrum Disorder and Stuttering (#6730)

      There has been increased interest in understanding the variety of speech disfluency patterns among those with autism spectrum disorders.

      Case studies that describe types of disfluencies have added to our knowledge base. While both stuttering and 'atypical' disfluencies (final part-word repetition) have been documented, many questions remain unanswered. What treatment methods are effective? What are the priorities for improved communication? What should we expect for positive functional outcomes?

      In this 2 hour presentation, Vivian Sisskin, M.S., CCC-SLP from the University of Maryland, summarizes the literature pertaining to disfluency in autism, and provides basic principles to aid in differential diagnosis and treatment planning.

      A case study, demonstrating effective treatment for final part-word repetitions, highlights a problem-solving approach to clinical management, using both learning style in autism and strategies from traditional fluency therapies.

      Filmed at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia during the Stuttering Foundation Mid-Atlantic Workshop, Philadelphia, PA, July 2012. Filmed and edited by Bob O'Brien, Video Design Productions, Inc., Lake Zurich, IL.

      Special thanks to Lisa A. Scott, Ph.D. and Joseph Donaher, Ph.D., and the 15 Stuttering Foundation Mid-Atlantic Workshop Attendees.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Stuttering: A Clinical Review of the Evidence (#6330)

      Stuttering: A Clinical Review of the Evidence (#6330)

      In this engaging 77-minute lecture, Dr. Joe Donaher of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, provides a framework for clinicians to view childhood stuttering from an evidence-based perspective. He presents the latest research in stuttering onset and development, genetics, neurophysiology, and speech motor control.

      He then helps clinicians understand how to apply this information to the children on their caseloads through the use of several case examples, emphasizing the importance of viewing each child as an individual and creating a strong therapeutic alliance.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Helping Children Change Thoughts & Feelings (#6335)

      Helping Children Change Thoughts & Feelings (#6335)

      For many children who stutter, successfully managing communication involves more than just changing speech. During this 2 hour 55 minute video, renowned clinician Vivian Sisskin, presents a multidimensional approach as a foundation to help children address the thoughts and feelings that sometimes co-exist with stuttering.

      She offers concrete strategies to help children become more mindful about their communication, to answer others' questions about what stuttering is and why they talk the way they do, and to recognize how their feelings influence their behavior.

      Additionally, she presents therapy ideas that will assist children in learning to stand up for themselves, to make active choices about speaking situations, plan actions they will take, and take risks.

      Recommendations for documentation and measurement are also provided.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Clinical Management of Chronic Stuttering (#9331)

      Clinical Management of Chronic Stuttering (#9331)

      This 58-minute video features Eugene B. Cooper, Ph.D. and Hugo H. Gregory, Ph.D. in live footage from a 1984 conference, "Clinical Management of Chronic Stuttering."

      From the archives of the Stuttering Foundation, and despite some granular video quality, these two presentations are sure to enlighten a new generation of therapists.

    • Scoring Disfluencies (#6350)

      Scoring Disfluencies (#6350)

      Many methods have been developed to count speech disfluencies, and in this 1-hour video, clinicians are trained to differentiate between various types of disfluencies, how to code them, and analyze the data accordingly.

      While this is just one aspect of a comprehensive fluency assessment, it is important to obtain reliable frequency measures for assessment purposes as well as to determine treatment effectiveness.

      After being trained in several methods, including Northwestern University's "Systematic Disfluency Analysis" (Campbell and Hill, 1987) and Vanderbilt University's disfluency counting method (Conture, 2001), Diane Parris, M.S., CCC-SLP, BRS-FD of Boston University demonstrates a pragmatic approach to scoring disfluencies using two case examples for practice.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (05:29-) How to Analyze a Speech Sample
      (07:11-) Scoring Disfluencies
      (14:19-) Case Study #1
      (21:39-) Scoring Transcript from Case Study
      (51:08-) Fluency Analysis
      (52:13-) Case Study #2
      (57:35-) Close

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Stuttering Modification Techniques (#9221)

      Stuttering Modification Techniques (#9221)

      This single program combines five classic videotapes from the 1970's presenting clinician Dr. Harold Starbuck using his stuttering modification therapy techniques with a group of teens and young adults.

      Despite the scratchy audio track and grainy visual quality of the tapes, you will learn a great deal from Dr. Starbuck's lucid teaching style.

      "His demonstrations of each step of therapy using several individuals who stutter will make it possible for you to develop your own version of stuttering modification therapy from start to finish." - Barry Guitar, Ph.D.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Program 1: Identification and Analysis
      (41:05-) Program 2: The Process of Post-Block Correction
      (1:23:41-) Program 3: The Process of In-Block and Pre-Block Correction
      (2:07:57-) Program 4: Predetermined Speech, Dismissal and Transfer
      (2:47:24-) Program 5: Motivation

    • Counseling the Parents of Children Who Stutter (#9090)

      Counseling the Parents of Children Who Stutter (#9090)

      This 60-minute DVD featuring speech-language pathologist Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., University of Iowa, includes:

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Purpose of Presentation
      (01:33-) Recognizing & Understanding Emotions
      (11:46-) Parent Emotions
      (21:19-) Counseling Issues
      (35:29-) Confusion & Inadequacy
      (43:21-) Confusion & Anger

      It is an ideal tool for clinicians who work with the school-age child who stutters. The information and practical ideas encompassed in this film ensure that it will be a lasting source of help to school clinicians, parents, teachers and health care professionals.

    • Stuttering 101 (#9501)

      Stuttering 101 (#9501)

      This 71-minute video, featuring speech-language pathologist Barry Guitar, Ph.D., is an ideal tool for clinicians who work with the school-age child who stutters.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (03:38-) What is Stuttering Modification?
      (06:37-) What is Fluency Shaping?
      Elements of Stuttering Modification
      (09:30-) A. Key Concepts
      B. Steps in Therapy
      (17:00-) 1. Exploring Stuttering
      (23:47-) 2. Modifying Stuttering in the Therapy Room
      (40:48-) 3. Transferring
      (44:56-) 4. Maintaining
      Elements of Fluency Shaping
      (46:55-) A. Key Concepts
      B. Steps in Therapy
      (50:58-) 1. Establish Fluency
      (52:05-) 2. Teaching Fluency Skills
      (1:06:26-) 3. Transferring Fluency
      (1:08:40-) 4. Maintaining Fluency
      (1:09:01-) Wrap-Up

      This video is part of a series of programs from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician."

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • The School Clinician: Ways to be More Effective (#9502)

      The School Clinician: Ways to be More Effective (#9502)

      This 84-minute video features speech-language pathologist Peter Ramig, Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder and includes:

      - Teaching children to identify moments of stuttering
      - Sequencing therapy in a meaningful way
      - Developing transfer/maintenance skill

      It is an ideal tool for clinicians who work with the school-age child who stutters. Part of a series of tapes from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician."

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (08:04-) General Stuttering Info
      (14:17-) Intervention with Children Who Stutter
      (14:53-) a. Sample 1: Chloe
      (19:46-) b. Sample 2: Nikky
      (29:23-) c. Sample 3: Thomas
      (31:52-) Basic Principles Underlying Intervention with CWS
      (48:24-) Sample 4a: Christopher (9 years old)
      (54:58-) Samples 4b: Christopher (2 years later)
      (1:08:50-) Determining Whether Treatment is Recommended for Young Children
      (1:13:41-) Fiberoptic Laryngoscopy
      (1:24:17-) Close

    • Multidimensional Approach to Assessment & Treatment (#9503)

      Multidimensional Approach to Assessment & Treatment (#9503)

      This 73-minute video features speech-language pathologist E. Charles Healey, Ph.D., University of Nebraska.

      His presentation includes:
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (02:50-) Assumptions & Perspectives
      (04:25-) Some Recent Multidimensional Models of Stuttering
      (07:49-) Conceptual Framework for Our Model
      (08:26-) Our Multidimensional Model
      (09:37-) The CALMS Model of Stuttering
      (11:28-) The CALMS Rating Scale
      (30:30-) Case Study - Kyle
      (36:51-) Bridging the Gap Between Assessment & Treatment
      (38:41-) a. Cognitive Component Activities
      (50:53-) b. Affective Component Activities
      (53:42-) c. Linguistic Component Activities
      (59:59-) d. Motor Component Activities
      (1:06:03-) e. Social Component Activities
      (1:09:25-) Final Thoughts

      It is an ideal tool for clinicians who work with the school-age child who stutters. Part of a series of videos from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician." The information and practical ideas encompassed in this film ensure that it will be a lasting source of help to school clinicians, parents, teachers, and health care professionals.

    • Dealing Effectively with Attitudes and Emotions (#9504)

      Dealing Effectively with Attitudes and Emotions (#9504)

      This 79-minute video, featuring experienced speech-language pathologist Kristin Chmela, M.A., is an ideal tool for clinicians who work with the school-age child who stutters.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (12:34-) Attitudes & Emotions
      (18:43-) Dealing Effectively with Attitudes & Emotions
      (19:32-) Three Types of Counseling
      (21:35-) Listening & Valuing
      (25:15-) Who am I as a Clinician?
      (26:25-) What is My View of Stuttering?
      (27:25-) Ways to be More Effective
      (27:40-) a. Programs vs. Programs
      (29:18-) b. Create a Communicative Space
      (35:04-) c. Brush Up on Normal Development
      (46:48-) d. Study Your Skills
      (56:18-) e. Take Timed Risks
      (1:06:33-) f. Conceptualize Cognitive-Affective Topics
      (1:16:12-) g. Document Your Goals
      (1:16:39-) Wrap-Up

      Part of a series of videos from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician."

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.

    • Dealing with Guilt and Shame (#9505)

      Dealing with Guilt and Shame (#9505)

      This exciting video features Bill Murphy, M.A., Purdue University on how to cope with shame and guilt.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Introduction
      (07:20-) Why Worry About the Thoughts & Emotions of School-Age Children Who Stutter?
      (11:57-) The Goal
      (12:57-) The Stuttering Triangle
      (14:00-) Assessment Tools
      (22:35-) Paper & Pencil Tasks
      (25:12-) Portfolio Assessment
      (29:55-) Child Observation
      (30:54-) Therapy for Preventing/Reducing Negative Thoughts
      (31:37-) Shame vs. Guilt
      (45:00-) The Conspiracy of Easy Fluency
      (46:53-) Goals
      (49:18-) Islands of Competency
      (50:47-) Keys to Progress
      (51:40-) Two Approaches to Healthy Thoughts & Feelings
      (53:01-) Desensitization: Externalizing Stuttering (Level 1)
      (55:30-) Activities to Desensitize/Externalize
      (1:06:34-) Desensitization: Level 2
      (1:09:07-) More Desensitization Level 1 Examples
      (1:14:00-) Dealing with Bullying
      (1:23:47-) Let’s Talk to Your Class
      (1:27:35-) Closing Remarks

      Part of a series of programs from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician."

    • Stuttering Intervention for Teenagers (#9506)

      Stuttering Intervention for Teenagers (#9506)

      This 90-minute video, featuring speech-language pathologist Patricia Zebrowski, Ph.D., is an ideal tool for clinicians working with adolescents who stutter.

      (start time) TOPIC
      (00:00-) Stuttering Intervention for Teenagers
      (10:41-) Understanding Adolescence
      (18:37-) Getting to Know the Adolescent
      (33:02-) UI Program for Teens Who Stutter
      (35:38-) A. Motor Training & Mental Training
      B. Motor Training
      (37:15-) 1. Education
      (44:26-) 2. Behavioral Awareness
      (50:20-) 3. Problem Solving
      (59:40-) a. Fluency Skills
      (1:01:51-) b. Stuttering Modification
      (1:08:07-) 4. Relaxation
      C. Mental Training
      (1:10:04-) 1. Cognitive Restructuring
      (1:10:52-) 2. Automatic Thoughts
      (1:14:14-) 3. Identifying Automatic Thoughts
      (1:18:34-) 4. Tips from Athletes
      (1:25:24-) 5. Guided Imagery
      (1:28:00-) 6. Emotions Related to Stuttering

      Part of a series of programs from the Stuttering Foundation annual conference, "Stuttering Therapy: Practical Ideas for the School Clinician."

    • Cluttering (#9700)

      Cluttering (#9700)

      This 42-minute video demonstrates cluttering, and should help you work more effectively with children and adults who clutter.

      Chapters include:
      - Most common symptoms of cluttering
      - Coexisting problems with cluttering
      - Evaluation of cluttering
      - Treatment of cluttering

      Dynamic demonstration of cluttering therapy techniques by experts.

      Written and narrated by Florence L. Myers, Ph.D., Adelphi University; Kenneth O. St. Louis, Ph.D., West Virginia University.

      This video is eligible for ASHA CEUs. Go to www.stutteringceus.org for details.